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Defibrillator

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vulcan42 | 15:10 Mon 29th Oct 2018 | Health & Fitness
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I heard part of the Jeremy Vine show when he and Sarah Jervis MD were talking about the defibrillators that are now being distributed around the country. Unfortunately both these presenters are more concerned about hearing their own voices rather than giving out useful information. So, does anybody here know?
Does the kit contain emergency scissors for cutting off clothing?
Can the machine be used on children or only adults?
Does it work by battery and if so, does it have to be recharged? in other words could it fail after a certain period?

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The online defibrillator map sites aren't that great. They rely upon people telling them where the machines are located, with a large number not being shown. For example there are two within a three minute walk from my house which aren't shown. (There are others available in our small town, with a population of 4500 people, too). AEDs (automatic external...
15:59 Mon 29th Oct 2018
The online defibrillator map sites aren't that great. They rely upon people telling them where the machines are located, with a large number not being shown. For example there are two within a three minute walk from my house which aren't shown. (There are others available in our small town, with a population of 4500 people, too).

AEDs (automatic external defibrillators) started appearing in places like railway stations about 15 years ago. If you get to see the Department of Health's official training video about them you'll see me in it, as I was the supervisor at the station where it was filmed. We spent several days learning about the machines and doing practice runs with them (often with the film director requiring several retakes of each shot), so we got to know them well!

Assuming that the latest versions are similar to the ones we trained on:
(a) the boxes contain scissors to cut through clothing ;
(b) there's a battery inside the device to run the monitoring equipment and to provide the shocks ;
(c) there's a mains supply to the cabinet which holds the box, keeping the battery constantly charged ; and
(d) in the fairly unlikely event of it needing to be used on a child, I can't think of any reason why it couldn't. The monitoring equipment simply discerns the difference between a regular heartbeat and atrial fibrillation, irrespective of actual heart rate. The shock simply has to be strong enough to stop the heart, so it should certainly work on a child.

It has to be remembered though that an AED is totally useless where there's no heart activity at all. Its function is to stop the heart (not to start it) in order that, hopefully, the heart will restart itself with a normal rhythm. They also shouldn't be used on anyone where the presence of a scar suggests that they've got a pacemaker fitted.
Excellent practical answer by Buenchico and not a link in site.
"The monitoring equipment simply discerns the difference between a regular heartbeat and atrial fibrillation, irrespective of actual heart rate."

I think he means ventricular fibrillation in the above.
Thanks for the correction, Sqad.
Yes, it detects ventricular fibrillation. It will say "no shock advised" if it can't find that or if the heart is beating normally. Our's also contains a razor for shaving very hairy chests (the pads won't stick properly if someone is waring their chest wig)
*wearing*
I did think it was a bit late in the day to use on the late rugby commentator, 237SJ. ;-)
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Many thanks for your answers, I wish radio presenters would, if they're covering a subject like this, tell us the relevant facts.

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