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1ozzy, isn't that accurate?
Depends how narrow ones mind is Naomi
Zacs-Master

/// We also don't refer to them as 'none white' ///

Didn't realise you were an Aussie Zacs?

But here in the UK most persons refer to black persons as non white it is not only polite, but it is also a true description, unless of course one is looking through rose tinted specs.
Is that a yes or a no?
Naomi - // Andy-hughes, are you quite well? You said “You can assume that white children don't 'belong to' (what an appalling phrase that is)” – to which I replied “Perhaps you don't feel your children belong to you because you didn't give birth to them. Who knows?” – and you claim that is “an appalling slur”. How ridiculous. Get a grip for goodness sake. //

Please stop wriggling, it's not clever - maybe you can return to the thread now?
^That to 1ozzy.
Since there are at least four ways in which the children and the adult could be related without needing to raise concern, then yes -- jumping to the conclusion that the mismatch suggests a suspicious explanation that must be definitively discounted is, at the very least, shockingly poor judgement. Uncle, step-father, adopted children, strong family friend, godparent... the list goes on.
andy-hughes, I see wriggling ... but it's not coming from me. This is abject nonsense.
Naomi - Why can't you stop digging and return to the thread?
Jim, questioning doesn’t equate to jumping to conclusions.
What would she have done if the children were black and the bloke was white ?
jim - // Since there are at least four ways in which the children and the adult could be related without needing to raise concern, then yes -- jumping to the conclusion that the mismatch suggests a suspicious explanation that must be definitively discounted is, at the very least, shockingly poor judgement. Uncle, step-father, adopted children, strong family friend, godparent... the list goes on.

You list five reasons - let's not forget 'baby-sitter'!!!!!
andy-hughes, I haven't left the thread. I've addressed the issue you introduced and more recently responded to Jim.
naomi - // Jim, questioning doesn’t equate to jumping to conclusions. //

Indeed it doesn't.

But following for an hour and then calling the police does!
andy-hughes, Had the man been sensible and taken a moment to speak to her properly, I doubt she'd have felt it necessary to follow him. It could have been resolved there and then.
This thread showcases AB at its worst. The poster, in an earlier thread of theirs, made a reply about "lefties wriggling" in their responses. What we have here is righties doing their own bodily, and indeed moral, contortions in order to swerve what was very clearly an act of blatant racism. We even have accusations of the man handling it badly, being the cause of the whole problem, and that - heaven help us - he should have been grateful and thanked her. It absolutely beggars belief. Regardless of all the dancing-around going on here, she thought that a black man with two white children was wrong and must be challenged. In this thread, we even have the notion that if it were a white man with two black children, also in a public place surrounded by CCTV, that too should rightly be challenged. Heaven forbid anyone, adult or child, should be in the presence of an adult or children of a different skin colour, as it must mean something is wrong. What a horrible, soulless, shrivelled way of thinking to start with; to then calmly justify it, and to then further make the man the villain of the piece and berate him for his lack of gratitude, makes my skin crawl. Would the same challenge be 'justified' if the parties were white/asian, Welsh/Polish, or any other combination you can think of?

As suggested earlier, I also think a female guardian would likely not have aroused "suspicions". Add in the possible different ethnicities of a female babysitter, and it starts to look like we need a detailed set of guidelines on when and when not to challenge.

There's no suggestion the children were distressed-looking at the time; if they weren't, I'd suggest they may well have become distressed by their guardian then being challenged by a stranger.
/// Men are simply less trusted. ///

Eh! that's a bit sexiest :0)

One would not dare to say women are simply less trusted, that would be Misogynistic.
Or
Muslims are simply less trusted, that would be Islamophobic.
Or
Black persons are simply less trusted, that would be racist.
Or
Homosexuals are simply less trusted, that would be homophobic.
Or
Foreigners are simply less trusted, that would be Xenophobic.

No one seems to be particular concerned when such statements are aimed at the long suffering males. :0)

Angry black man chases kids around car park, angrily throws them in back of car.
Very, very old, frail white women says he shouldn't treat children that way.
Black man threatens to kill her.
Drives 100 yards up the road and thinks hang on, I went too far there, I could be in serious trouble what with my probation and all.,
'I know, I'll use the trusty old race card, now where's my camera'

That's right, I know as much as you people know before he switched his camera on. Doesn't stop some of you knowing exactly what happened.
Without knowing her reaction to seeing a white man with black children or a black woman with white children, whether she is racist or sexist is just speculation... but I agree that if she had valid concerns she should have called the authorities straight away. That is very odd behaviour at the least.
Pixie- AH claimed earlier she should have followed him, not rang the police straight away.
Can't win, sometimes.

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