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But surely the vaccine is not available yet?
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Neither is travel JD , listening last night to LBC a vaccine will be rolled out imminently
Qantas boss Alan Joyce said he believed it would be a necessity for passengers to be vaccinated once a vaccine is available
yes absolutely all forms of travel should do it.
ok pedants, all public transport, ok?
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I know we have no vaccine yet but we will be getting one and soon so let's focus on when this happens ?
have the government said they'll be issuing official proof of vaccination certificates? without certificates how would an individual prove they had the vaccine? how much will a certificate cost?
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I guess you'd have to have some kind of proof Mushroom and that would be on the point of sale, ie buying your ticket
maybe we'll all have to have vaccination cards, like all pets have.....
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Wouldn't be a bad idea Mushroom :0)
The vaccine is only 90% effective.
So 1 in 10 have it.

A negative test certificate within 7 days of travelling would be better.
sunk; "The vaccine is only 90% effective.
So 1 in 10 have it. " - err no, 1 in 10 could have it. In reality 90% immunisation would stop the spread.
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I'm amazed on FB the way the anti vaxxers are likening it to Thalidomide which wasn't a vaccine, it was an anti sickness drug for pregnant women !!
That's FB for ya. Bobbi :-(
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Yeah and you can't educate the uneducated Ken
Forgot to add, the problem with that is many believe everything they read on FB. My youngest daughter is guilty of using FB to get most of her info.
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A lot do and a lot don't, similar to the media Ken
Bobbi - Thalidomide definitely was not an anti-sickness drug for pregnant women; pregnant women are precisely who should NOT have been taking it! The fact that they did is why so many malformed babies were born.
brainiac, it was prescribed for morning sickness.
"A negative test certificate within 7 days of travelling would be better."

A person could test negative seven days before the flight but test positive any time in the following seven days.

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