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Is 'God Save The Queen' the British national anthem, or the English one?

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sp1814 | 08:44 Fri 27th Jul 2012 | News
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Bit of a hoo-ha this morning because Ryan Giggs and Ifeoma Dieke refused to sing the national anthem.

I found this on an old report frm the BBC:

The little-known and even less-sung sixth verse of God Save the Queen implores God to come to the aid of Marshal George Wade, who was sent to quell rebellious Scottish highlanders in the wake of the Jacobite rising of 1715.

It says: "May he sedition hush, And like a torrent rush, Rebellious Scots to crush."

So was the national anthem originally that of England, which should be recognized by the whole country, or are the Scots and Welsh right to view it in the context within it was written?

(By the way - did anyone else know that there were so many verses???)

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The "rebellious Scots" does not refer to all Scots per se, merely the rebellious ones of that time.
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I've always thought Jerusalem was a much better tune...but then again - that's a celebration of England, rather than Britain.

Land Of Hope and Glory? Hmm...not sure about that one. Better tune than GSTQ, but perhaps a little too much pomp and not enough circumstance?
does anyone know the words to Land of Hope and Glory? They are pretty purple, and end up with the King again.

Land of Hope and Glory, Mother of the Free,
How shall we extol thee, who are born of thee?
Wider still, and wider, shall thy bounds be set;
God, who made thee mighty, make thee mightier yet!

Truth and Right and Freedom, each a holy gem,
Stars of solemn brightness, weave thy diadem.

Tho' thy way be darkened, still in splendour drest,
As the star that trembles o'er the liquid West.

Throned amid the billows, throned inviolate,
Thou hast reigned victorious, thou has smiled at fate.

Land of Hope and Glory, fortress of the Free,
How may we extol thee, praise thee, honour thee?

Hark, a mighty nation maketh glad reply;
Lo, our lips are thankful, lo, our hearts are high!

Hearts in hope uplifted, loyal lips that sing;
Strong in faith and freedom, we have crowned our King!
Whenever I hear Land of Hope and Glory, it makes me think of the very non-pc version the Goodies did as the Black and White Minstrels.

Rule Britannia at the Last Night of the Proms, however, is very stirring stuff
"does anyone know the words to Land of Hope and Glory? They are pretty purple, and end up with the King again. "

I know it wasn't originally intended as such, but I think the last line could be interpreted for modern purposes as sort of poetic/mythical rather than as explicit celebration of the monarchy as it was originally.

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And I agree with some others on thread - GSTQ/K isn't a terribly good anthem because it doesn't *really* celebrate the nation. Personally, I'm not particularly interested in national identity, but I think suggesting (as the use of the song does) that you can't be British and a Republican is really quite crass and wrong-headed. And it sounds awful. Land of Hope and Glory just sounds better.
god save the queen's a stupid and dreary anthem. They should take the opportunity to change it when the current monarch dies.
I think the national anthem should be 'vindaloo'... I suspect it would be an unpopular choice.
Land of Hope and Glory was written specifically FOR the coronation of Edward VII in 1902, so - although many English people imagine it is very much "theirs" - it is clearly British, the king being ruler of all of Britain and its empire. Jerusalem is very much more English.
GSTQ is no worse a dirge than Flower of Scotland is and both should be scrapped without further ado. I've always liked Billy Connolly's idea - as suggested above - that the Archers' tune should replace GSTQ.
All will be solved when the Sweaties are Independant.

And the sooner the better.
I say this every time the subject comes up, but GSTQ is a waltz, not a dirge; all it needs is to be played faster. Jerusalem is much dirgier, besides having the name of a town in the Middle East.
PMSL !

Even when they played God save the Queen at the womans football game the second verse was not sung by any British player or loyal British suppoter.
It's a waltz played at dirge speed, but essentially it's just not a very good tune, and the words are outdated.

Being a waltz doesn't help, but Star Spangled Banner is also one and that seems to work.

Seriously, they have a perfect opportunity to change it when the queen dies. I don't think it would be right mid-reign.
ChuckFickens - verse 6 (admittedly seldom sung)

Lord, grant that Marshal Wade,
May by thy mighty aid,
Victory bring.
May he sedition hush,
and like a torrent rush,
Rebellious Scots to crush,
God save the King.
O flower of Scotland
When will we see your like again
That fought and died for
Your wee bit hill and glen
And stood against him
Proud Edward's army
And sent him homeward
Tae think again

The hills are bare now
And autumn leaves lie thick and still
O'er land that is lost now
Which those so dearly held
And stood against him
Proud Edward's army
And sent him homeward
Tae think again

Those days are passed now
And in the past they must remain
But we can still rise now
And be the nation again
That stood against him
Proud Edward's army
And sent him homeward
Tae think again
"May he sedition hush, And like a torrent rush, Rebellious Scots to crush."

Most apropos for modern times, me thinks.
We should use 'England's glory' by Ian dury
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