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Types Of Vaccines

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barnaclebill58 | 13:11 Tue 12th Jan 2021 | Body & Soul
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I've found that there are the following types : mrna, recombinant spike protein , adenovirus or inactivated virus? Not all licensed or may be eventually available in the UK.
Given a complete freedom of choice which is best, any to avoid or it is best just to not have any?
Thanks

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if you want to have some measure of protection, i'd say it's not "best" to not have any. I don't think there'll ever be a situation whereby you get a choice.
you get what you get and you don't get upset
on the nhs that is
I agree with bednobs^^^^^^
Don't get too clever with the immunology, just obey the official recommendations.
The first one you are offered is the best one; once you've got that your protection begins.
In England you will be offered the vaccine that is available where you go and the only choice will be take it or leave it. My choice will be take it and unless you have one of the physical conditions where the medical advice is not to be vaccinated against covid, I suggest that yours should be too.
Question Author
Yes but I said given a complete freedom of choice . So out of academic interest, which is the best please? They all can't be equal
You mean which is the most effective, the one that gives you greater immunity for the longest period of time?

Don't know and neither do the scientists. I will personally take what I am offered.
Question Author
Ok then which
1. Is likely to be most effective short term
2. Is likely to last longest wihtout a booster
3.Is the least likely to develop side effects 5 years down the line
I know nothing about different vaccine types.
1 nobody knows
2 see 1
3 see 2
4 see 3
barney.....much too early to answer any of those questions BUT at this moment:

Astrazeneca (Oxford) 70 to 90% immunity.
Modern 94% immunity
Pfizer 90% immunity.

So they say.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/health-55625276

Explains the differences between the 3 vaccines.
Question Author
That leaves recombinant spike protein and inactivated virus to be explained. I've googled but can't find anything in plain English for the RSP . On inactivated -it may have been the all knowing man down the pub-I 've heard that the inactivation doesn't always work.

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