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Military Jargon

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crisgal | 14:37 Tue 18th Jun 2019 | Phrases & Sayings
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I am a Hypnotherapist and have a client who is ex Army.
I don't need to put any details here, but I believe that she is still feeling like she needs to be on high alert - to' protect and serve' as it were, (at least subconsciously).
In order to help her, I want to deliver the therapy in a language she understands, that is quite direct - as if she is taking orders.
I have no knowledge of Army Speak and would like to now, how are you relieved of duties? What would the officer say? I don't want it to sound like she is being discharged because of anything bad. I also don't wan to get it wrong and be 'American'. as her subconscious won't accept that.
Could anyone help me with some jargon that may be familiar to her?

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Sorry for errors - stupid phone!
He could say that he thought she could do with some R & R (rest and recuperation)
as you were
or stand down
stand down?
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Oh R and R - I love that!
Is there a way they deliver praise? To say they've done a job very well?
Do they stand easy? Or is that American?
You need one or two veterans to contribute here. Baldric is one, ex RM. Stand easy is not American. I do know that.
stand at ease; then stand easy.
"fall out" is when the work is finished. They do a 90 degree turn, one step on the spot and then break ranks I think.
To offer praise just say " good job,well done".
10cs. I too am a vet of 9 years experience.
fall out
I did a dog watch in the wrens lol x
Stand Down or Stand Easy will be acted upon instictively as being relieved of tension.

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