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Syrian Refugees, Not Happy On The Remote Scottish Island Of Bute.

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anotheoldgit | 16:10 Mon 25th Jul 2016 | News
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3706625/Syrian-refugees-settled-remote-Scottish-island-complain-depressed-area-old-people-people-come-die.html

/// Rasha said the island was ‘full of old people’ and described it as ‘where people come to die’. ///

Looking at the other side of the coin Rasha, the old people on the island of Bute could say their Island is now becoming 'full of foreigners', and described it as 'where they come to sponge off us'.

But then that would be racist, wouldn't it?

/// Struggling to learn English, the fathers of the families – who both used to run businesses – said that most days they stay indoors or take walks on the seafront, feeling isolated. ///

Seeing that these fathers have all that time on their hands, so as to take part in these pursuits, and they and their families are supported by the British taxpayer, perhaps they could use this leisure time helping out the 'OLD' people of Bute, in return for all the hospitality that has been bestowed upon them.









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AOG - //andy-hughes

/// I think it is wonderful that we as a society are able to help people worse off than ourselves, but giving them an improved unpleasant situation is not the same as giving them the support they need ///

There are plenty of our own who are much worse off than some of us could possibly imagine, but are they given the opportunity to live on a remote Island, all costs paid? //

There are plenty of UK residents (our own) that live in difficult circumstances, but to suggest that they are comparable with the conditions that these refugees have left behind simply does not hold weight.

Far too many British people are homeless and without money - but if you add to that living in a war zone with the prospect of being shot any moment a very real possibility - it does open something of a gulf between the two sets of individuals, I am sure you will agree.

// its average resident is aged between 55 and 59, ///

Hardly old aged, but what the **** any excuse. //


Fifty-nine is not old to me, but then I am sixty-one - if I was thirty, or below, I would see things very differently.
Mamya. Just that I always have fancied living somewhere remote! But I have others to think of
After only 8 months I'd be amazed if they weren't struggling to speak English, especially given the accent of the locals and the probable use of Gaelic in the communities. I know if I was plonked on an island off the African coast i'd struggle to learn the local language in 8 months unless I was given strong support.
Question Author
Mamyalynne

/// Nellie, is it not possible for you to get there? ///

All expenses paid, along with free food and accommodation, I very much doubt it.
I believe a great source of resentment was (a) The Islanders were not consulted and told that they would have these people foisted on them by mainland government. NIMBY!!
(b) Very little social housing on Bute but priority given to new arrivals.
(c) Jealousy due to handouts like Iphones and new bikes given to the children which Islanders would struggle to afford for themselves.
Question Author
andy-hughes

/// There are plenty of UK residents (our own) that live in difficult circumstances, but to suggest that they are comparable with the conditions that these refugees have left behind simply does not hold weight. ///

No one especially me have suggested that our destitute family's living conditions can be compared to the hell hole these have left behind.

I think you will find that I am comparing the conditions that these Syrian families are now experiencing which are much more better than some of our own are forced to endure.
Some are clearly not totally happy and maybe were hoping to be closer to friends, and some are probably ungrateful types who moan at almost anything. But there have been stories of really grateful refugees who have settled into homes and communities, schools or found work. The Mail knows what will excite its readers
Understood Nellie.

I'll say this then leave it, to me it would have been much better (for everyone) if families with school age children and fathers/parents who want to work had been better placed.

Yes retro, the bikes. They can't read the road signs and keep riding the wrong way down one way streets to the annoyance of other road users, or so I read.

Nellie, give me the nod and I'll come with you.
I understood the SNP thought far more should be taken in; and they are by far the most popular party in Scotland so one assumes the locals share that view and welcome refugees
Question Author
andy-hughes

/// Fifty-nine is not old to me, but then I am sixty-one - if I was thirty, or below, I would see things very differently. //

These two ungrateful ageist are not thirty or below, they are 41 and 42.
You can't dictate what makes someone feel depressed.

It must be very isolating for them.
Question Author
fiction-factory

/// The Mail knows what will excite its
readers ///

The truth perhaps?

Yes that is a little thin on the ground these days, no wonder it excites.
Always two sides of the coin.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3366575/Senseless-Syrian-refugees-foisted-remote-Scottish-island-high-unemployment-poverty-given-perks-locals-don-t-enjoy.html

//Indeed, in September, a Lebanese minister, Elias Bou Saab, told Mr Cameron that two people out of every 100 in his country’s refugee camps were IS radicals planning to infiltrate Europe.//

In light of the incidents in Germany it would seem Mr Saab has given the Islanders of Bute very good cause to be apprehensive of their 'guests'.


Only today one of our Scottish correspondents said she wouldn't go to Germany at this moment in time. Perhaps she could have some empathy with her Bute neighours who are closer to home.!! :-(






Question Author
ummmm

/// It must be very isolating for them. ///

If it is crowds of their own they wish for, I think there are still vacancies in the Calais jungle.
Things will improve when they learn the Language.
If they have so much time on their hands they should be working really, really hard to learn English. Complete immersion in a language is a very good way to learn to use it reasonably well and reasonably quickly. I can't understand why one man said that he'd like to move to Glasgow to meet people who spoke his language and then he'd pick up a bit of English. The complete opposite is more likely.

They should count their blessings and determine to make a go of it. The bikes and Iphone gifts are just ridiculous.
Theyll take to the sea to reach the mainland.....
There is fertile land and bountiful sea. Give them seeds & fishing rod to start up business.

They have free education, welfare, housing, NHS, infrastructure & services. Thats more than me!
AOG - //I think you will find that I am comparing the conditions that these Syrian families are now experiencing which are much more better than some of our own are forced to endure. //

I did not deduce that from your post, but thank for the clarification.

But again, stating that something is not as you would wish it is not the same as moaning about your lot.

Similarly, just because someone can be perceived as worse off than you does not of itself make you feel better - the neighbour's broken leg won't ease your toothache. He may be in more pain than you, but that doesn't alleviate your experience.

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