SIGN UP

Anniversary Year of the War of 1812

Avatar Image
Clanad | 22:25 Mon 28th May 2012 | History
22 Answers
Another connection between two peoples divided by a common language (apologies to Sir Winston Churchill of perhaps Wilde).

This year is the 200th Anniverseray of the War of 1812... ya'll burned Washington, but in exchange Francis Scott Key wrote the The Star Spangled Banner[i (our National Anthem) while watching the bombardment of [i]Fort McHenry[i].

However, the biggest victory for the American side was the elimination of [i]pease] as a food (favorite of the Brtish troops). Whew! No one ever eats pease here!

Answers

1 to 20 of 22rss feed

1 2 Next Last

Avatar Image
4th November 1775, the Continental Congress stipulated the requirements for Garrison Rations and these were distinctly similar to those of the British Army, including "3 pints of peas [pease] or beans per week, or vegetables equivalent". In short time the "vegetable equivalents" were specified as onions, potatoes and turnips. Although US Army rations...
23:21 Tue 29th May 2012
Pease pudding hot
pease pudding cold
Pease pudding in the pot
Three days old.
Our American cousins don't know what they're missing.
Sounds like a pretty violent year

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1812
Anyone who boils carrots and peas in the same pot is unhygienic.
Dogma rules OK ?
Was that not when the White House was painted white to hide the scorch marks?
Useless piece of information. I used to work in an office in Edinburgh which had been designed by the same architect who designed the White House.
We had an American writer visit as part of research for a book he was writing about the architect and the White House.
I often wondered if he got it published
nungate - I believe that the Irish-American architect of the White House has no direct links with Edinburgh architecture per se. County Kilkenny born James Hoban was apprentice to Cork born Thomas Ivory in Dublin before emigrating to the US.

Forgive the following ramble, but it includes direct and convoluted connections to Auld Reekie...

To facilitate construction of Hoban's White House, master stonemasons were sought throughout the US and Europe; at least eight were recruited in Edinburgh. These eight masons, being Freemasons, were founder members of the Federal Lodge No.1 in DC, with the first Lodge Master being architect James Hoban. No doubt the Lodge would have been visited by President George Washington who had been initiated to Masonry four decades earlier in the Fredericksburg Lodge, Virginia - this lodge received its Charter from the Grand Lodge of Scotland, Edinburgh.

[Ramble ends]

Basil Paterson College makes proud claim that it "was built by the same stone mason that constructed the White House in America!".

http://www.basilpater..._language_school.html
One man's pease is another man's dhal.....dammit Clanad this post is enough to get you branded racist..... ;)
Question Author
Apparently Hoban designed the White House to be a replica of the house of the Duke of Leinster in Dublin, which was a very typical Irish country home.

As to the fire... it gutted the structure, but (some say Providentially) a rain storm doused the fire. It was[i painted with a limestone white wash but was later repainted with a white, lead based paint.

Now, if the [i]italics] function on this site would work as well as the stirring up a debate about Brits food and Irish country home designs...
Pease a 'favourite of the British troops'? Are you sure about that, Clanad?!!
Question Author
Heathfield, this website (and others) states that a part of the daily ration issued to British troops during that War includes 3/7 pint of pease ...

http://www.warof1812.ca/food.htm
Mushy peas, similar to pease, I believe, are considered a delicacy still in parts of the north of England
Is that like guacamole?
Hopkirk, you not Peter Mandleson in real life, are you?
How very dare you
lol. Didn't he mistake guacamole for pease in a chip shop in Hartlepool while campaigning for election?
See at about 26 seconds in
http://www.youtube.com/watch?gl=GB&feature=related&hl=en-GB&v=zdBuDSEokz0
4th November 1775, the Continental Congress stipulated the requirements for Garrison Rations and these were distinctly similar to those of the British Army, including "3 pints of peas [pease] or beans per week, or vegetables equivalent". In short time the "vegetable equivalents" were specified as onions, potatoes and turnips. Although US Army rations changed relatively little until 1892, pease fell out of favour in the years leading up to the American Civil War at which point potatoes were included as a regular ration component.

Peas [canned] were reintroduced for the "New Army Rations" of 1933.

http://www.qmfound.co...he_army_1775_1950.htm
http://www.qmmuseum.l...my.mil/ccc_forest.htm
the pease provide the breeze
to make your banner flutter
the unpleasant smell if you please
is down to bread and butter

Sir Jonny Fartpants ( 1775- 1777)

1 to 20 of 22rss feed

1 2 Next Last

Do you know the answer?

Anniversary Year of the War of 1812

Answer Question >>

Related Questions

Sorry, we can't find any related questions. Try using the search bar at the top of the page to search for some keywords, or choose a topic and submit your own question.