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Immune System.

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Georgiesmum | 14:25 Thu 04th Mar 2021 | Body & Soul
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Ive heard people say that if you have the covid injection and dont have any reactions from it that its a sign you have a good immune system., however yesterday someone told me the opposite is true. Who is right? Does anyone know please?

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People say lots of things, with very little to back it up with, especially with vaccines. Who knows?
Theprof is the only one here who might know. Hopefully he'll see your question. I would be interested in the answer too.
Google food that boosts your immune system. Eat well, drink lots of fluids.

I've been in hospital a few times over the last 18 months and they put a massive importance on diet, sleep and exercise.
Question Author
Ive always believed in vaccines and have always made sure I had all mine when offered. I had no reaction at all after having my covid jab nor did anyone I know,


I've been told I have a low immune system, and after my jab, I did have a reaction about 9-10 hrs later and was retching all through the night. I haven't heard about reactions being linked to your immune system though, so will be interesting to know if that is the case.
The truth?
The reaction, local or general bare no relationship to the production both positive or negative of antibodies or the immune response.
Alternatively, could you set up a second facial recognition with your face mask on?
Oops, sorry, wrong thread :/
I don't think that anyone knows or cares. I think the thing about its a good thing if you get side effects is a useful meme to encourage people to get the vaccination rather than for them to be worried about getting side effects. I am a side effect getter and my sister is not...it seems to be one of those things
neither
nothing to do with the health or otherwise of your health immune system
OK. Georgismum, the question you ask is about what we call reactogenicity. This word is a catch-all term for the way we might react physically to the vaccine either at the injection site by skin redness, pain and swelling and/or more systemic effects that affect the whole body, such as fever and headache.

Studies into the reactogenicity of the covid vaccines have not demonstrated a link to immunity, which means that regardless of whether you have a good immune system or a compromised one, it has no bearing on the likelihood of you having a reaction to any of the vaccines.

Sqad is absolutely right!
.// Theprof is the only one here who might know. //
oh crap - he is an organic chemist NOT an immunologist
he will verify this. - and has been advising on how the amino acids fit together to give the viral binding site and the invariant site (epitope) the antibodies are directed against.
How do I know this? I have read and understood his posts

I've been told I have a low immune system,
yes and everyone here has said that your low flying immune system is not a threat to life.
well that makes sqad me and the prof !
A slightly different question...
If you have a severe reaction to the vaccine does it mean the vaccine has worked really well on you?
And if you have little or no reaction to the vaccine does that mean the opposite...it’s worked but not as well as in people who had a bad reaction?
Or does a persons reaction have no bearing at all on how well the vaccine has ‘taken’ and the protection it’s giving the recipient (that’s my guess)?
No, No and Yes Vagus.
Thanks theprof :)
I think your state of health at the time of vaccine might be a factor, not necessarily your immunity. I never had bad reactions to vaccines until a few years ago when my general health deteriorated. Then a dreadful reaction to the flu jab in 2019 and a common reaction to the Covid jab, which hung on for a while. We are all different.
Well send me to the back of the class Peter!

Seems you've got the wrong end of the stick here regarding what I am so I'll enlighten you - is that you sitting next to me at the back? Well this is for you.

I've degrees in biology, botany, chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry from UK red brick universities, Russell Group universities and Ivy League universities. They range from BSc to MSc to Phd along with D.Phil and ScD and DsC. Cantab and Oxon are also shoved in there as well. I've been a lecturer,senior lecturer, reader and professor and Dean along the way.

It is true that nowadays I tend to confine myself to biochemistry, a subject that nowadays includes immunology and a whole host of other disciplines connected with research into Covid, so you could say I have a teenzy-weenzy knowledge of the issues at stake here.

Last year I was asked to oversee Covid research at a well-known government laboratory classified as Biosafety Level 4 with seconded clinical and academic immunologists among the 116 members of the team. These people report to me. So who appointed me to this laboratory command structure? The UK Government. The mandarins convinced me I was the best person for the job. Nuff said. Oops, forgot to add that a Biosafety Level 4 facility came under my control last Friday; I'm sincerely hoping I'll be able to spend this weekend at home.

Right now, some of my week is spent at the university whilst the rest of the time, I spend at the facility.

Finally, I do apologise to other readers of this post regarding the necessity of pointing out my academic qualifications in this way. I detest blowing my own trumpet over my position and my degrees having come from a working-class background but it it's only right that I provide some background information in my defence.

Hope that has clarified matters for you Peter. Address all concerns regarding my ability to:

Mr B Johnson
10 Downing Street
London
SW1A 2AA



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