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RebelSouls | 18:57 Mon 04th Oct 2010 | News
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Have you been away, yes we had a mini break in Manchester

http://www.dailymail....re-workers-north.html

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I suppose that they will argue it's an investment against future savings to be made when they close down their expensive London sites.
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Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt accused the BBC of being “on another planet”
Isn't this similar to what most companies do when they relocate but want to keep the skilled workforce?
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No
So you've never heard of companies paying people to relocate...
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I used to work for a large multi national when some of the jobs moved the people were offered around £1,500 to help with relocation to the other side of the country. One off payment no weekend trips, make your mind up by the end of the week as other people want your jobs.
RS v BBC, again and again and again.........
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Must add the union went in and the firm extended the offer for two weeks this was to allow the people to travel at the weekend to view the town to see if they fancied moving.
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No Surrender gingejbee
Sounds like you lucked out with your employer and prehaps it was to do with an abundance of available workforce in the new location.
People want the BBC to be less London-centric. Relocating to the North and paying to entice the staff to relocate is probably a lot cheaper than sacking them all, paying out redundancy fees and having to employ/train new people at the new location.
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Coobeastie i never lost my job at that time , i had the chance of moving when the other people declined the move and they needed skilled people to move.
There will be very few people employed by my ex firm in this country and Scotland as all jobs are going to the far east same as a lot of the manufactures
Don't see why the BBC should move out of London, it's where it's happening.

Imagine getting the news from some northern town!
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Deadline they are making all the gas lamps work by electricity
Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt accused the BBC of being “on another planet”

Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt's grasp of astronomy is poor. Manchester is on the same planet, and actually not that far from London.
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Manchester maybe but the BBC are not
You want to work for a different multi-national then.

When the company I work for wanted to relocate a lot of us to the US they flew anyone interested over there with their wives and families and showed them a good time for a week.

So no it's not that unusual
1st, You don't get a tan in Manchester

2nd, If a company is moving jobs abroad to get a cheaper workforce they are not going to give you a free holiday and want you having a nose round the new factory
unless you work for JTP's firm.
I think the difference is, jake, that your company probably bases its decisions on commercial grounds, and the proposed relocation was seen to be commercially attractive and achieved the best results for shareholders. The costs and benefits fell on the Company and its shareholders. If the moved proved a costly failure, again it would be the shareholders who pick up the bill.

The BBC is somewhat different. It is funded by a compulsory tax on all those who watch television (whether they watch the BBC or not). Coobeastie suggest that “...People want the BBC to be less London-centric.” Which people would these be, exactly? It is true that after the move some 50% of BBC’s staff will still be in the capital. However, since announcing this proposal in 2004 the Corporation has struggled to provide a commercial reason why it should go ahead, citing such reasons as “...The corporation says the north currently has lower levels of approval of the BBC.” What does that mean? And will it be cured by ending a programme’s credits (when people have left the room to make a cup of tea) with “Made in Manchester” instead of “Made in London”. I doubt it.

To compare the BBC’s decision (and the actions needed to see it through) with one made by a commercial company is a bit specious. The BBC may well have valid reasons to transfer some staff to the Frozen North, but I doubt if their decision was made on commercial grounds.

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