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Surely It Is Not Only Potential Black Students, Who Come From Lower-Performing Schools And Live In Areas Of Relative Socio-Economic Deprivation?

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anotheoldgit | 13:14 Wed 20th Jul 2016 | News
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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/2016/07/19/oxford-college-to-increase-intake-of-minority-students-following/

/// Figures showed Oxford took just 27 black undergraduate students two years ago, as campaigners called for the ‘decolonisation’ of the curriculum. ///

/// Students will only be eligible for the extra places if they are expected to achieve the university’s standard conditional offer for the course to which they have applied, if they come from a lower-performing school and if they live in an area of relative socio-economic deprivation, it added. ///


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The only mention of "black" in the article is that which you quote, and refers to the past as an example of possible lack of opportunity to that group, not who is to be considered going forward.

I think it is a worthwhile attempt to create an "even playing field", but will need to be monitored to ensure it doesn't replace one inequity with another.
.. inequality ...
Like I ^%£$^£ well typed !
There goes the neighbourhood..
//Students will only be eligible for the extra places if they are expected to achieve the university’s standard conditional offer for the course to which they have applied, if they come from a lower-performing school and if they live in an area of relative socio-economic deprivation, it added.//



Apologies, on reconsideration I think I opted for the other word anyway. I'll go have a lie down.
//This is the first time an Oxford college will solely take pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds as part of an increase in undergraduate numbers.//


Let's hope it isn't the last, good move by University College.
Question Author
Old_Geezer

/// Oxford college to increase intake of minority students following pressure to widen access ///

Are whites who come from lower-performing schools and live in areas of relative socio-economic deprivation, now also classed as 'minorities'?
It could mean 'minority' in terms of inner-city comprehensive schools rather than the often better performing urban schools/academies...
I'd have thought deprived ones should be in the minority. I suppose it is how you interpret the statement.
How you interpret ......... that'll be it , yes.
Still rather looks to me like positive discrimination. And I dont mean by colour of skin.
Since, as the article makes clear, this is clearly *not* being accompanied by a lowering of standards, it's about trying to send a message that the place really is inclusive and trying to encourage further (successful) applications. This can only be a good thing, really.

Oxbridge has been working hard to try and reach out to students from places other than the stereotypical public school image it has been associated with. Why? Because it benefits the place to have as many good students, from as many backgrounds as possible.
And the far larger group who went to a good Academy rather than a public school or a dump can go hang then? Very inclusive.

I'm sorry but ANY discrimination is bad.
Question Author
jim360

Couldn't agree more Jim, but the need for them to issue this statement, puts a whole different meaning to equality.

/// Figures showed Oxford took just 27 black undergraduate students two years ago, as campaigners called for the ‘decolonisation’ of the curriculum. ///
dress it up how you like , interpret it how you like...at the end of the day its all about blacks..simple as..too many people just dont want to admit the truth
@AOG

First thing I think we should ask is, in the year where 27 were accepted, what was the backstory? That is so say(ask) how many applicants to begin with and how many applicants failed entry at the point of A-Level results?
Just to be sure that minorities were applying as eagerly as the "over-represented" group, you understand, not shunning Oxbridge due to it being full of 'toffs'.

Secondly, are we talking about substitution of "some" whites for "some" of minority ethnicities or an expansion in student capacity?

Important to stress this one because, in order to bump the requisite number of whites of the selection list, you have to raise the bar for entry standards to make them fail. And then the minorities entrants have to pass that raised standard, too.

The problem with that is, faced with wall to wall 4 x A* grade application forms, the only way you can grade them further is at interview stage.

If discrimination occurs anywhere at all, it's at the interview panel.

Well, presumably that group can still have access to the other 10 times as many places per year.

Obviously there's still work to do but while not everyone can go to Oxbridge widening access to a traditionally massively underrepresented part of the population is still worthwhile. Like I say, partly it might just be trying to challenge a (false) perception that Oxford is not open to minority students; I don't think this perception is nearly as strong any more when it comes to Oxbridge not being welcoming to white students from underprivileged backgrounds, so there is simply less need for action there.
Excellent post there Hypognosis!!!
AOG

You're inferring something from the article which is not borne out by the details.

There's nothing to suggest that it's only black kids from poor backgrounds who will benefit from this.

What you've done in your OP, is to take two completely unrelated paragraphs in the article, and put them together in order to suggest cause and effect.
"There's nothing to suggest that it's only black kids from poor backgrounds who will benefit from this. "

oh do get real..... for once....

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