Speeding police car

As I drove home last night I was overtaken by a police car with blue lights flashing. About 500 yards after me the police car drove past a speed camera (sorry, safety camera) which also flashed.

Just wondered if anyone knows what might happen to the driver
14:09 Fri 09th Mar 2012
 
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exdc
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Sorry (damn mouse pad)

The driver will still be served an NIP like any other member of public but can return the form claiming a statutory exemption for emergency vehicle use etc along with supporting evidence.

Statutory Exemptions

Speed

By virtue of Section 87 Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 (as amended by Section 19 Road Safety Act...
14:30 Fri 09th Mar 2012 Go To Best Answer

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The officer driving should log with their control that they've activated a speed camera, then when the ticket comes through they'll have to complete a form and as long as there was a genuine reason for them speeding past the camera (they were on an emergency call) the ticket will be cancelled.
if he can show he was on an actual shout at the correct date and time, nothing, otherwise he'll get prosecuted for speeding.
-- answer removed --
The Force will get a Notice of Intended Prosecution and identify the driver
Sorry (damn mouse pad)

The driver will still be served an NIP like any other member of public but can return the form claiming a statutory exemption for emergency vehicle use etc along with supporting evidence.

Statutory Exemptions

Speed

By virtue of Section 87 Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 (as amended by Section 19 Road Safety Act 2006):

1) No statutory provision imposing a speed limit on motor vehicles shall apply to any vehicle on an occasion when it is being used for fire and rescue authority, ambulance or police purposes, the observance of that provision would be likely to hinder the use of the vehicle for the purpose for which it was being used on that occasion.

2) Subsection (1) above applies in relation to a vehicle being used -
(a) for Serious Organised Crime Agency purposes, or
(b) for training persons to drive vehicles for use for Serious Organised Crime Agency purposes,
as it applies in relation to a vehicle being used for police purposes.

3) But (except where it is being used for training the person by whom it is being driven) subsection (1) above does not apply in relation to a vehicle by virtue of subsection (2) above unless it is being driven by a person who has been trained in driving vehicles at high speeds.
When Blue Lights Displayed and Illuminated

If blue lights are displayed and illuminated, then police will assume, in the absence of any evidence to the contrary, that the exemption is valid and no further action will be taken. No paperwork will be sent to the organisation concerned.

Narrative - Photographic or video evidence produced by enforcement cameras is viewed by staff at the Central Ticket & Summons Unit (CTSU). If the evidence shows that the ESV was displaying illuminated blue lights at the time the enforcement camera activated, the matter is discontinued at that point and no further action is taken. This applies to marked or unmarked vehicles.
Sorry, famous, I am back on my home computer now.

Different forces have different policies on this but chuckfickens answer is basically what happens although some of the lazy police facres are full of lazy bureacrats that produce lots of forms for this sort of thing.

If you require any info on these sort of things search the Net for ACPO policies (or should I say ACPO Ltd / Plc ) The Association of Chief Police Officers site - http://www.acpo.police.uk/
police facres - police farces
what about an ambulace that throws a blue light so that it can get around a que at a pedestrian crossing ?

What does an ambulance that is simply slowly flashing blue lights doing ? (ie before deciding they were suddenly in a hurry)
I drove back from the supermarket behind a police car tonight - not once did the driver signal when he turned into another road, or at roundabouts.
Sometimes an ambulance will undertake an emergency run at a slow speed so as not to jar or shake the patient (ie back injury) but will still need to negotiate red lights etc without stopping.
exactly shoota - sometimes care is more vital than speed
I once knew a friend who was a paramedic and got 'done' by a speed camera' going at 146mph. Naturally when they traced it back they found out he was doing it all in the line of duty and did not press charges. They sent the photo of him 'speeding' in a birthday card.

Does this answer your question, Famous5?
Do you know the only vehicle that can legally go through a red light?
The Queens Conveyance?
A Royal Mail vehicle !!
So an ambulance that is slowly flashing blue lights with no noise is still on an "emergency" ?
Thunderchild - are you making a point?
no just asking - I don't know, I often see an ambulance going around in no hurry with light flashing but no noise. Did here say once that it's because their carrying a body.
Blues and twos are there for the function they perform, they are merely safety tools and do not in themselves indicate "emergency". Emergency sevices use them as appropriate. Often at night they will use only the lights but if they encounter a jam of some sort then the siren will be used as necessary.

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