Driving en France

Doing a long road-trip (about 550 miles) from Dunkirk to the South of France soon. Haven't taken the car across the Channel for years. I'b be grateful for any hints and tips..
21:29 Mon 17th May 2010
 
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Er, remember to drive on the right?

Or, possibly more usefully, use the best European route planner:
http://www.viamichelin.co.uk/

and read the AA's general advice on driving abroad:
http://www.theaa.com/...e/overseas/index.html
together with their specific information for France:
http://www.theaa.com/...ips/france-monaco.pdf

If you're looking for cheap roadside accommodation, try Formule 1:
http://www.hotelformu...m/gb/home/index.shtml

Chris
I wouldn't try formula 1 if I were you - did it last year - OK but a bit too rough and ready - communal bathrooms etc.

try http://www.hotel-bb.com instead

Make sure you have a sat nav you probably won't use it much but when you get causght in rush hour traffic, make a wrong turn ant a roundabout it's a life saver. Plus you can set the location when you park, put it in your pocket and wander about towns not worrying about how to find where you parked.

Now legal requirement to carry flurescent tabbards (waistcoats) in your car if you're travelling on autoroutes.

Depending on where and when you're goping remember that some parts of the autoroutes can be mindblowinly congested. The spot that jumps to mind is where the E11 runs out outside of Montpellier before hitting the E15 along the coast
Remember the standard of driving in France is awful. They are compulsive overtakers and will overtake on blind bends etc and then just sit in front of you. Don't get drawn into their bad behaviour, just relax and as long as you are moving forward that's fine. Have a good holiday
The flouorescent jackets jake-the-peg mentioned needs to be carried INSIDE the car at all times, on all roads. Also, there must be one for every occupant of the car. Other compulsary items are a first aid kit and warning triangle.
The French are very strict now (as others have said) about taking safety equipment with you, you must have it in the car at all times. Warning triangle, safety vest, first aid kit.
Question Author
Thanks for the info guys - I'll bring back some sticks of rock (or the French equivalent!!)..
If you do find a nice b & b (family friendly) can you post details of it for me please? (We are driving from Calais to the south of France in August and want to stop of on the way.)
Question Author
Hi K.

Yep certainly will.
Thank you.

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