MOT Advisory notice and Car insurance

I've just got an MOT done where i have been given an Advisory notice that primarily refers to low tyre threads (close to legal limit) and Parking break efficiency being close to minimum requirements. If there was an accident where my car was involved can the Insurance company cancel the policy or refuse to cover my claim because of the Advisory Notice items ?
19:05 Sat 08th Sep 2007
 
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no,because they are only advisory,as long as the car has passed its fine,but i would put the matters right asap,as they could cause a accident
it's not as cut and dry as Norman has stated. If the condition of your vehicle can be proven to have cuased the accident, then the insurance company can refuse to provide indemnity.

The tyre won;t be an issue so long as it is 1.6mm or more (obviously as it wouldn't pass the MOT if it was lower).

It will depend on the length of time after the test that the accident occurs etc - a lot of variables to take into account.

And don't forget that MOT details (including warnings and failures) are on-line for anyone to see - I check this site on all claims to ensure that everything is above board.

If you have an accident four weeks after an MOT and the cause was one of the advisories, then you could be lokoing at paying a contribution towards the costs of the claim as you were aware of the potential fault - don't forget that an MOT only shows your car was road legal at the time of it's issue
it is as cut and dry as norman states. the vehicle only has to meet the minimum required legal standard at the time of test. however it does state on the back of the mot certificate that in no way does the mot guarantee that the vehicle will be roadworthy for the next 12 months , this is the owners responsibility. what else is the person supposed to do if he takes the car for its annual test (run by the half a r se d government and ministry of transport) and it passes!!!
No david, the question relates to having an accident, not the validity of the MOT.

I am an insurance claims handler, I investigate insurance fraud, and having been doing this for many years now.

Yes, the car has to meet the legal requirements at the time of the MOT, but after that, if the car is not in a roadworthy condition, all bets are off.

Harry didn't specify the length of time after the MOT that the accidnet occurred. If he had theoretically had the accident two days after the MOT advisory's were issued, then that could be deemed sufficient time in which to get the items repaired - the insurer doesn't necessarily have to cover this damage.

so what else is the guy suposed to do if he takes it for its mot and it passes??whats the point of the whole mot system then???so if the mot comes into it when you make a claim then why does it not come into it when you take the insurance out in the first instance???so basically you can insure a car that has no mot but its only relevant when you make a claim.
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