Do I need insurance?

I have amassed a large amount of 'Strongman' equipment (tractor tyres etc) which I use in my training regime. I have started to let my friends/family/colleagues use the equipment. I provide refreshments for these sessions and ask for a small donation to cover the costs of equipment/drinks etc. As I am technically charging people to use my equipment do I need liability insurance? Can I get them to sign a form that exempts me from responsibility if they get injured using the equipment? Any advice would be greatly appreciated!
19:31 Fri 06th Apr 2012
 
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Buenchico
Best Answer
There's no statutory obligation for you to obtain insurance. However you might find it wisest to seek some (although you could well find problems doing so, as many insurers would probably require you to hold some form of safety certificate for your equipment - e.g. issued by a relevant trade association - and/or a recognised qualification in fitness...
23:18 Fri 06th Apr 2012 Go To Best Answer

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i would say yes, get insurance, it's a business after all
There's no statutory obligation for you to obtain insurance. However you might find it wisest to seek some (although you could well find problems doing so, as many insurers would probably require you to hold some form of safety certificate for your equipment - e.g. issued by a relevant trade association - and/or a recognised qualification in fitness training).

A disclaimer, of the form you suggest, would almost certainly be invalid under the terms of Section 2 of the Unfair Contract Terms Act 197:
http://www.legislatio...reach-of-contract-etc

Chris
If you are charging people an entry fee then you would need insurance. Chris is never ever wrong and a disclaimer would be invalid as he says.

You have asked our advice and now you have to act on it.
very sensible question Big Boy to which the answer is clearly yes.

shouldnt be a lot

This comes up a lot with peopel car sharing and paying petrol: they dont realise that there is a contract for hire which may or may not invalidate their insurance
Yes you do, and no you can't. Even in car parks where organisations say they accept no liability, that doesn't exempt them from negligence claims - you need PL insurance.
-- answer removed --
^The above poster has now banned after posting dozens of relies over quite a long period.
^ meant to type ...SPAM REPLIES...

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