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Would Police Feel Pride For Stopping A Suicide?

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Indysoda | 23:22 Tue 12th Jan 2021 | Society & Culture
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Or would it seems less significant than saving a life in another way?

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Saving a life is saving a life. I don't understand what you mean by less significant.
23:28 Tue 12th Jan 2021
What a weird question.
What he ^ said
Yes.
Saving a life is saving a life. I don't understand what you mean by less significant.
I'm unsure of the use of the word pride in your query.


I should think anyone who helped save a life in any circumstances would be very pleased they had.
Question Author
Glad the question seems weird. Here is an American officer’s answer to the same question: It makes for good press and it makes the sheep feel good when they hear that a sheepdog prevented a suicide. But, in the end, the wolves need to be culled and the lives of the sheep don't matter. Most civilians don't respect the police enough, and fully one-third of Americans have a criminal record, so a police officer is taking a risk that they're just enabling a criminal to live another day and to commit more crimes.
Two thirds don't have a criminal record. What is your point?
He's not the one making a point, John. Re-read the the OP's last post.
It’s a 33% risk they’re saving the life of a criminal versus a 66% chance they’re not. I think the police officer is probably in the wrong job.
Question Author
Considering Brits’ responses vs American attitudes, it appears the States would be better off if the Boston Tea Party never happened. UK is such a civilized nation. (I’m a Uruguayo residing in the US)
have you got a link to that statement, ie where it was published?
Question Author
https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20210112233533AAqZ429

Same question in a Law Enforcement section of yahoo answers. Also asked in a Argentine forum, curious as to global attitudes. By far the least compassionate answers come from American police. Off topic: The US policeman who gave me a speeding ticket couldn’t understand that my home country of Uruguay was not located inside Mexico. I’ll pay the ticket, but he maybe could glance at a map.
You are citing the opinion of one anonymous troll from a Q&A website as a measure of national humanity?


Question Author
Trevor, I am using that as an accurate example of national attitudes in law enforcement. The troll is likely a disgruntled officer, and there are plenty verified police who say similar things. But if you wanna be optimistic and say I’m wrong, I’d love for that to be that case.
you don't even know that that answer came from a cop.
more difficult than saving someone who does not want to die, I would have thought.
//...it makes the sheep feel good when they hear that a sheepdog prevented a suicide. But, in the end, the wolves need to be culled and the lives of the sheep don't matter...//

This is nonsense
Bearing in mind the attitudes I encountered during my nursing career from members of the police regarding the suicide attemptees, I am not so sure that they showed any more compassion than the US. Mostly they considered them time wasters and attention seekers, the ambulance crews mostly held similar views rather than seeing them as suffering from mental illness.

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