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Paigntonian | 00:35 Fri 02nd Apr 2021 | News
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Item on Sky this evening that said: "incidents of sexual abuse in English and Welsh universities were found to be the tens of thousands".
1. What constitutes 'sexual abuse'? A wolf-whistle, an inappropriate drunken kiss, the touching of an elbow? Attempted rape? Not specified.
2. 'were found to be' means precisely what? Were all these claims investigated? Probably not.
3. Always unsure when people use phrases like 'in the tens of thousands. So how many?
Unless they define what constitutes 'sexual abuse' these so-called statistics are utterly meaningless.

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They should have included the name of the report/survey and who carried it out, then you could have read the no doubt reams of words on the topic.

Lazy reporting.
I might regret saying this but it seems as if “Cheer up, love, give us a smile” is a form of sexual harassment.

I had this this every day walking to school. Never thought to complain about it. It was just normal. I was always a bit apprehensive walking past building sites, though.

Just shut up and do your job, will you.
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Mamy. You're right. But in my book things like wolf-whistling (which I would never do) is inappropriate behaviour and does not constitute 'sexual abuse'. Things can only change if we use appropriate terms, recognise when women feel threatened, or feel they are being abused, and we can try to deal with the problem from there.
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I'm also deeply unsure about what is continually called the 'rape culture'. Just don't fully understand what that means and I certainly don't believe that, in what passes as British culture, it is a reality.
You just said they didn't specify, so why are you adding specifics.
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Mamy: I'm just sharing my thoughts. Isn't that what we do here?
It's hard to discuss a News item that seemingly had no specifics and I did not see.

I know what sexual abuse means to me having been there.

My experience won't necessarily be the same as yours or anyone else's.

We had a long thread on the different ways people respond to things such as wolf whistles only a couple of days ago.
is this the report that came out last year?
Maybe they are trying to address your statement of ‘things can only change if we use appropriate terms, recognise when women feel threatened, or feel they are being abused, and we can try to deal with the problem from there’ by making a start by asking university students about their experiences?

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Sherrardt: I think the stats are bogus. Ask all the students you want. What we need to know is what sexual abuse actually means. Then we may be able to confront it. Cloverjo said 'shut up and so your job'. Agreed!
Just who should shut and do their job?
Maybe Paigntonian should join the real world
just saying for a friend
The most recent version of this story I could find was from november... it appears to refer to this report (which I found in about three minutes btw):

https://www.emerald.com/insight/publication/doi/10.1108/9781789730593

I cannot see the definitions that they used because the report is not open access sadly... but we don't really know what they are. It could be bad research it might not be... though it's probably best to actually find out rather than dismiss it based on 'gut feelings' on what we want to be true...
"I'm also deeply unsure about what is continually called the 'rape culture'. Just don't fully understand what that means and I certainly don't believe that, in what passes as British culture, it is a reality. "

It is not hard to find out what it means paigntonian
sherrardk //Just who should shut and do their job?//
Men who make girls feel uncomfortable.
My recent post on wolf whistling shocked me at how many people consider that sexual abuse - and as for all these kids coming out of the woodwork I can't believe they consider such things to be abusive. I also find it hard to believe that they don't do something about it if they feel mistreated - at my school the girls would have got together and given a lad a good slap if they felt he was being out of order and failing that would have sent their brothers round to have a word. But then I don't understand people putting up with abuse of any kind - heard only yesterday of a woman who has been beaten by her husband for seventeen years but relies on him for all her money and comfortable lifestyle so won't leave him - I would have cut his b*lls off with a carving knife after the first time.
All that's well and good, but why should the onus be on victims to deal with it better, rather than on perpetrators to behave better? Even if you held that it's just the way they were brought up, that means that we need better education to at least reduce, if not eliminate altogether, the instances of people who treat others so poorly. Likewise, it's a bit late for men to be learning about what's unwanted if somebody has to stab them in the wherever for them to get the point.
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So sexual harrassments a joking matter gulliver- some are begging for it, eh?. For a socialist you have some very odd view's and have a knack of making me doubt whether am in the right party

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