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Birmingham Council Have Released New Street Names

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Bobbisox1 | 11:38 Wed 09th Dec 2020 | News
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https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9031341/Birmingham-council-accused-woke-virtue-signalling-naming-street-Diversity-Grove.html

Are they? I'm not sure, we have a Thatcher Close here and the estate was built in the 70s so I doubt it would have been named after those men who thatched roofs??

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according to one source its linked to the slave trade..
//Have they re-named the Bull Ring the Camel Market//

The bull ring is not a market
And camel markets don't confine their sales to camels ...
i think Naomi was being somwhat tongue in cheek...
possibly.......
;o)
well its an interesting question, perhaps BCC council will have a rethink and name their streets after some local natables.
notables... sorry
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Jackdaw, where did Newcastle originate ( I'm interested)
The history of Newcastle upon Tyne dates back almost 2,000 years, during which it has been controlled by the Romans, the Angles and the Norsemen amongst others. Originally known by its Roman name Pons Aelius, the name "Newcastle" has been used since the Norman conquest of England. Due to its prime location on the River Tyne, the town developed greatly during the Middle Ages and it was to play a major role in the Industrial Revolution, being granted city status in 1882. Today, the city is a major retail, commercial and cultural centre.
sure Jack can add more to this, its what i could find, very interesting, as was the origins of Brum
Looking where the names will be used it's a very diverse area, it's not like someone has put the names in Edgbaston or Harborne.
are they not so diverse areas then Rowan?
Emmie has summed it up. The name derives from the new castle (there wasn't an old one), built during the reign of William II (1087 - 1100).
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Thank you both
Only the keep of the castle now remains, tucked away behind St. Nicholas' cathedral. It contains nothing of interest so does not attract tourists. Charles I is said to have been imprisoned there when he was captured on his return from Scotland during the Civil War.
Until the mid 19th century the castle served as a prison. Convicts who were to be hanged were taken by cart from the castle to the Town Moor for execution. They passed through the North Gate which later became known as Gallowgate, home of St James' Park.
you got to admit, that Britain has an interesting history.
London's history is amazing, i have only scratched the surface, but fascinating for all that

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