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It's way past time to have learnt to live with it. But we have scared risk adverse folk running the show and prepared to ruin all in order to be seen "doing something".
^ I couldn't agree more. I have a friend who works in the NHS (practice nurse at the local GP practice) During lockdown she worked from home via the internet for 3 days a week and she went into work for the other 2 days. She said to me that she risked her life going into work. Hello? If she has been risking her life in the office, well I have been risking mine for 35 years whilst working on an aeroplane. We don't bleat about that though - we just get on with it.
We have to. There really isn't a choice. Nobody likes the idea of risking others... but lots of us still drive, etc.
237SJ - // She said to me that she risked her life going into work. Hello? If she has been risking her life in the office, well I have been risking mine for 35 years whilst working on an aeroplane. We don't bleat about that though - we just get on with it. //

Those two comparisons don't actually match up.

You don't say what you did 'working on an aeroplane' but whatever it was, you understood and accepted the minimal risk to your life when you signed your contract.

Your friend's risk is far more likely to come to fruition, with a minimum risk of a nasty infection, and a maximum risk of death, not only for her, but for anyone she came into contact with - and none of that risk was made clear when she undertook the job she is doing.

So it's understandable that she is 'bleating', she is in an unknown risk situation she didn't sign up for - you are not.
Risking your life just doing your job? Plenty of people do that. In the past, coal miners did it every day. People currently working with dangerous chemicals are taking a risk aren't they? Many years ago, I used to work with a chemical called Toluene Di-Isocyanate, TDI to you folks. Note the word Isocyanate. It contains CYANIDE. We carried it round in open buckets. Some people passed out whilst using it and became quite ill. For some reason, it never affected me. Maybe I'm immune to these things, CV-19 included. I AM INVINCIBLE!!!!

The way things are I don't think we have any choice other than to live with it.
We can either live it or die with it.

As I am classed as vulnerable I will continue to take precautions but refuse to be scared - at least at the moment. If I take care I have high hopes of living a bit longer. Hope you all feel the same.
I see 237's point rather than yours Andy. Many jobs (probably all) contain some risk, even if it's just part of the commute. Anyone who works in NHS was always at risk of coming across infectious diseases, long before covid. I doubt they were asked if they'd accept the risk just as I doubt any flight crew are told they might die in a plane crash as part of their induction.Furthermore - and I'm willing to be told I'm wrong - but I'm pretty sure that no-one with coronavirus symptoms got anywhere nears a GP surgery during lockdown.
// Might be too late. FTSE down 3% already thanks to Witless.
I wonder if he has a gold plated pension, not one that relies on markets like the rest of us?//

erm should know the answer to that

it depends on whether he has an NHS (contributory mind you) or a civil servant one - which of course is not bad

https://www.civilservicepensionscheme.org.uk/members/contribution-rates/

christ have you seen what the employers cont it ( civil service -) 30% but says it is defined benefit ( crappier than final salary)

https://www.which.co.uk/money/pensions-and-retirement/company-pensions/public-sector-pensions-explained/civil-service-pension-scheme-explained-ahkbz9d6t82f

his pension is likely to be half his yearly whack (on around £200 000)
// I doubt they were asked if they'd accept the risk just as I doubt any flight crew are told they might die in a plane crash as part of their induction//

this is the first generation where the doctors didnt die from their patients' diseases. thinks of doctors deaths

Didnt semmelweiss ( chlorine water for hands) die from an infected pin prick ?
Mad Ludwig II killed his doctor - wurtz or fittig
Henry Gray ( anatomy ) - small pox from a relation

2% if medical students stopped their course 1900-1950 because they caught TB during their studies

Dicken cruel portrayal of Leigh Hunt (arteest and doctor apparently) Harold Skimpole is accurate - he sniffs a posy and wont go near Esther Summerson when she gets smallpox- his nerves wont stand it

er what point was I making?
anyway it was interesting to recall and write
//...but I'm pretty sure that no-one with coronavirus symptoms got anywhere nears a GP surgery during lockdown.//

Nobody with symptoms of anything whatsoever got anywhere near my GP's surgery during lockdown as it was - and to all intents and purposes still is - closed to the public.
Same with ours NJ, only telephone consultations are being allowed.
NJ - ditto! The only reason to go through the door at our practice is to collect a socially-distanced prescription. GPs all "working" from home via telephone.
Just get on with it. The Nightingale hospitals are and have been vastly empty. We’re not dropping like flies. Numbers are going up, but they’re cases not people being ventilated or dying.
Time to come on.
Yes we must learn to live with it. In my area it is extremely low but I still follow the rules. I don`t dwell on it or worry about it though.

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