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> The entry requirements to the UK and Ireland are very unlikely to diverge.

What makes you say that?

> The UK has always (well for almost 100 years) been happy to allow free movement of people from Ireland. That situation did not change when we joined the EU and will not change when we leave.

Once we're out and they're in and there's an open border, we've created a situation that we've never had before. Predicting where that will lead is a bit like predicting that a free trade deal with the EU would be the easiest in human history to negotiate.
// The UK has always (well for almost 100 years) been happy to allow free movement of people from Ireland. That situation did not change when we joined the EU and will not change when we leave. //

Of course it didn't change when we joined. Ireland joined on the same day.
Ireland and the EU are planning what happens if there is a no deal brexit.
If only the UK had some planning for that happening.
"Once we're out and they're in and there's an open border, we've created a situation that we've never had before."

As far as border control goes it will be exactly the same. Ireland has its own border controls with which the UK is content. I doubt they will diverge from ours in any significant respect but if they do (and they could whether Ireland is an EU member or not) the UK can reassess the situation. The fact that Ireland is not in charge of its own affairs in this respect is hardly he fault of the UK and should not be cited as a reason to compel the UK to remain in the EU.
> The fact that Ireland is not in charge of its own affairs in this respect is hardly he fault of the UK and should not be cited as a reason to compel the UK to remain in the EU.

I'm not.

I'm simply challenging your assertions that there will be no problem with an open border, as those assertions are based on assumptions that are in no way guaranteed to hold true in future. We have never been in a position where Ireland is in the EU and we are not.
Gromit, they have, well at least as far as the Irsh are concerned. Try Googlinf, plently about even from you favourite left rags.

And here is the official one:

https://www.dfa.ie/brexit/getting-ireland-brexit-ready/brexit-and-you/

"I'm simply challenging your assertions that there will be no problem with an open border, as those assertions are based on assumptions that are in no way guaranteed to hold true in future."

Nothing is guaranteed to hold true in the future. If nations (or indeed individuals) declined to do things simply there was no guarantee that things would always be the same then nothing would ever be done. We cannot be sure that the EU will even exist in the future, let alone what changes it will make to its members' legislation. At present there is no indication that Ireland will change its border arrangements. The biggest threat is if the EU insists it becomes a Schengen member (which is more likely than not). If it does the UK will have to reassess its position (with all the concomitant implications that has for the Good Friday agreement). But it is ludicrous to suggest that the UK cannot make a decision because "things might change." That is why so little gets done in the UK. Everybody is terrified of making a decision "in case things change". Far better to kick the can down the road for a few months or years and let somebody else deal with it. Things are always changing.

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