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Delaying Tactics From Uk Gov Re Britext

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crystalgirl | 08:32 Sat 23rd Jul 2016 | News
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Yes I know there is a new government,(mostly anti to opting out) it has been a month since the vote,and we get nothing positive happening just reasons for why not,in the news every article about Europe which we are being drip fed making a lot of the people who signed to opt out are wavering,I think we should make the UK GOV aware that if something positive is not happening we will become the joke of europe (like the boy crying wolf)
What do you think we should do to make sure that the government keeps in mind that the majority of the uk voted to opt out,we have a primeminster we didnt vote in.
crystal girl

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I'm unsure how long to wait is unacceptable, but I think it is fair enough to discuss among our team what our position is, and what we want, and the point we are not prepared to concede further, etc. etc. etc. We have different folk wanting to prioritise different things when the EU membership ends. They can't all be considered vital. We know the main reason to...
09:24 Sat 23rd Jul 2016
There's not a lot we can do other than be patient. The new PM has insisted on the creation of a new department or two entirely (so it is said) to implement Brexit. At the very least, you should wait until those departments are properly staffed and ready to negotiate the Brexit deal.

So best just to wait. The time to start getting really angry if Brexit hasn't started yet is probably March/ April next year (as it's expected that the negotiating process proper should start early in 2017).
Its not as easy as just saying we are out and if you think it is then you are very silly.

There are ongoing meetings and negotiations to be had before Brexit can happen - you are looking at a minimum of 2 years before you are free, that's minimum.
I share crystalgirl's disquiet, and I suspect many others do, too. Once Article 50 is triggered there is no obligation to rush into negotiations but any lingering suspicion that Brexit won't happen will be banished and uncertainty put to rest.
On the contrary once Article 50 is triggered there's a 2 year deadline, which explains the "delay" (4 weeks?) thus far, in part.
Looks like we're just waiting for Theresa to 'ahem' grow a pair and declare the non-binding referendum void then get on with things.
//Once Article 50 is triggered there is no obligation to rush into negotiations//
Wrong. Once it's triggered you've got 2 years in which to untangle 40 years of cooperation. If you don't get the best arrangement in that time, you're out in the cold.
Once A 50 is triggered the European Council meet WITHOUT the UK to decide the terms and conditions to be offered. If they are not prepared to negotiate on any particular aspects of the EU treaty (freedom of movement has been stated by France as the main aspect that will NOT be up for negotiation)
Few people including the present government seem to fully comprehend this.
There is no time limit on rescinding treaties - I would imagine we should be amending these for a lot longer than two years. As for the trade 'negotiations' with the EU, two years is more than ample. Ending uncertainty that Brexit will really happen is the most important consideration.
///Few people including the present government seem to fully comprehend this///
Maybe you should offer yourself as an advisor.
Well done all those who voted leave. This is your legacy. Unfortunately, you've dragged almost half of the country who voted remain into it too.
^^ If they are not prepared to offer concessions on specific parts of the EU treaty those parts will not be included in the' exit offer'. Freedom of movement has been stated by France to be the main aspect that can not be included in the exit offer to the UK, so we will be forced to accept freedom of movement if we wish to be included as part of the European Free Market.
I'm unsure how long to wait is unacceptable, but I think it is fair enough to discuss among our team what our position is, and what we want, and the point we are not prepared to concede further, etc. etc. etc.

We have different folk wanting to prioritise different things when the EU membership ends. They can't all be considered vital.

We know the main reason to exit was to regain control of our own country, to have our sovereignty back; so it should be obvious that there can be no compromise on ending the free movement of people. Free movement of other things are open to discussion depending on what the EU asks for in order to agree to access to the open market.

But what we don't need is for some to go into negotiations fearing lack of access, and convinced that is the top priority. It's this type of sorting out and getting all on board that is needed; and that'll probably take a while, especially if one wants to formulate plan B, C, D etc..
Some in France are trying to scare the UK negotiation team; but it seems all it does is convince some citizens, probably those who wanted to remain anyway. They would need to convince Germany that loss of free market trade with the UK was a good idea.

Good negotiators do not try to get the other side's 'back up' before negotiations start. Gaining control of our own country was THE reason to leave in the first place, which immediately indicates to all how ridiculous the recent French demand is. And how it is clearly (at best) a bargaining chip, a starting position that will need to be dropped.

Oh, and indeed, I too echo well done all those who voted leave. They are bringing those too scared to improve the situation that past governments have dropped us into, back to a state where we can be proud of ourselves again; and where we will start to prosper much better than before. It just needs times to complete and bed in, for there is little worthwhile that has no cost.
We were prospering anyhow. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
But if it isn't good enough, replace it.
With what?
With sovereignty of one's own nation, with global trade, with whatever can be negotiated with the EU going forward; for starters.
We had all that. (Still have).
Zacs-Master
Have you not had enough sour grapes.

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