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If you went deaf, would you want to hear again?

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youngmafbog | 13:10 Mon 03rd Dec 2012 | News
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http://news.sky.com/story/1019853/eastenders-rita-simons-accused-over-deaf-op

//Simons told Hello! magazine the hostility "comes mainly from people who firmly believe that deafness should be embraced rather than treated as a physical deficiency that should be corrected".//

Just who are these people to victimize someone who does not have their perverted beliefs?

Being deaf is not nice at all, it presents all sorts of difficulties. Signing and all the other gumpf (usually pushed by hearing people) does not get you on in the real world, if there is an option to help (cochlear implants are not effective for all) should it not be taken ?

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Deaf parents can be particularly vociferous in arguing against their deaf children having corrective treatment.

Always seems a rather selfish attitude
Yes, it should be taken.

My uncle was classed as deaf. He's had 3 ops. The outcome wasn't pleasant to start with, way too much noise for him to handle, but now it's great.

It's the little things in life. He'd never heard birds, we take that for granted.
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That is correct Zehul, I have must experience in this. One of my daughters is profoundly deaf, unfortunately there is nothing they can do for her but if there was she would go for it, she is 26 now and copes extremely well but would love to hear.

She hates being treated differently and has had numerous arguments with deaf associations etc. They even refused to let her help voluntarily when they found out she was against signing. And guess what, not one was deaf themselves.
All power to your daughter YMB
I have a profound hearing problem, if I did not have two very powerful hearing aids I would live in silence. I would give or try anything & everything to hear 'normally'. Having been deaf since a child, I've had to put up with bullying and ignorance - even still in my 40's. The sad part is, I've been treat like I'm totally stupid because I've not heard what has been said, I've had people in shops/organisations who totally give up trying to talk to me and instead enquire with my young daughter - as if I'm an idiot, despite my telling them I have hearing problem - so
(finishing off!) so I can't understand why some people believe it's abuse, blindness or other sense loss conditions wouldn't be considered so??
Can you imagine not being able to appreciate Mozart, Bach, Purcell, Telemann, Delius, and the rest ? If a deaf person were granted just one hour of perfect hearing, with the world's most glorious music to listen to, I can't believe thats/he would not wish to hear again.
It is my suspicion that some feel if their children are to have corrective treatment then that affects how they perceive as their own "value", for they still have the defect. It is part of their self image and do not feel able to agree to something that seems to say they are disadvantaged because of it. So they can not condone their children needing to be changed (as opposed to fixed). But there again I could be barking up the wrong tree.
^
Most of the 'Deaf Culture' zealots are people who are unlikely to be helped by any treatment.

Sad, but in some cases their admirable inner strength turns into an aggressive criticism of those who do undergo 'cures' and go over to 'the other side'
This does include some cases of parents denying treatment to their children.
I too have hearing problems and should wear my hearing aids when out and about. It's really annoying when I tell shop assistants that I'm hard of hearing and they then start shouting. I sympathise with you Meg. If I had a deaf child of grandchild I would hope they would benefit from corrective surgery.
Fortunately if this ever changing world with cures for almost anything scientists have cured deafness in mice. Maybe its only a matter of time before humans benefit.

A recent article:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/scientists-make-major-breakthrough-in-cure-for-deafness-by-restoring-deaf-gerbils-hearing-using-human-stem-cells-8130899.html
Yes, I would want to hear again. I have a hearing problem, my hearing aids have made it possible for me to hear properly. These people should mind their own business, the mother is doing the best for her daughter.
Do you find it hard, Marval?

My uncle couldn't handle the noise. It was the little things, birds, traffic, adverts. It drove him mad.
It's not too hard ummmm, I still have some hearing. I did have trouble hearing people, and the tv needed to be turned up really loud. It is much better now with the hearing aids. When I go to concerts I don't need to wear them.
I've never heard of this attitude before, and I find it baffling. I think Old_Geezer has made a very good point. For those who can't be helped it must seem like a slap in the face for those who can be treated.
atlanta

You wrote:

Can you imagine not being able to appreciate Mozart, Bach, Purcell, Telemann, Delius, and the rest?

True, but then there's also Jedward, Vanessa Feltz, Justin Beiber, Adam Sandler, Jeremy Clarkson and Loose Women...

So...swings and roundabouts.
He has some hearing. I think it was 20% in one ear and 10% in the other. His latest op was successful so he only needs a hearing aid in one ear. I still shout at him though.

His lack of hearing has made him very good at reading peoples expressions. He's a publican, he can see a row start before they even know they're having a row.
Its really annoying when I tell shop assistants that Im hard of hearing and they then start shouting.

McMouse, I have no wish to offend but if somebody said to me that they were hard of hearing I too would raise my voice in the hope that I could be better heard. If this is the wrong thing to do can you explain what I should be doing instead? Thanks:-)
ladybirder

I've been told by a friend who has a child with hearing loss that when you shout or consciously speak up, it's actually hard to follow if the person you're speaking to is trying to read your lips because you 'over-pronounce' words making you more difficult to understand.
OK sp, I get that, thanks. But what can I do that will help then?

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