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Been watching the days rememberance services both from Grosvenor square and Ground Zero

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Bobbisox | 16:47 Sun 11th Sep 2011 | News
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What struck me was how we British keep the "stiffer upper lip"
Americans have come to the podium and read names out of those lost on that fateful day , ending in how much they miss their loved ones, God Bless them and God Bless America, the British, same poignancy and heartfelt words, say just the name(s) before placing their long stemmed lily on the ground

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No of course not Triggs, it was just an observation today
it was a very poignant service at Grosvenor Square. It doesn't matter how you express your loss, losing a loved one this way, is a terrible thing.
I'm going to be shot down if I disagree with trigs - I was shocked, but I didn't cry.
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em, I understand this totally, it was a beautiful service in G square I was saying about the comparative differences I noticed
I prefer the stiff British upper lip and I hate wailing and weeping. I find Americans in general quite gushing and over the top. The wife of the Pilot of the first plane to hit the twin towers was talking on the radio this morning and whilst I obviously feel for her all she did was go over the top talking about religion and 'The Lord' having a purpose for 9/11.

I haven't watched any Rememberance Services. I watched the Grand Prix.
I am not a hard person, quite the reverse in fact. If these services help people then this is fine - just not for me though.
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LL, this is what I was noticing, it was a very moving tribute though, both sides of the Atlantic
I didn't cry when Diana died. I didn't know her, she hadn't touched my life in any way. I am very sad to think that any young person dies so young though. I found the whole Diana fiasco completely false.
Lottie, I agree - I know others feel differently, it was sad, but it didn't affect me at all.
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I see you as a very down to Earth person LL, no way near being hard at all
I think Lottie must be a long lost relative. I agree with everything she just said.
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she's very good at getting a point across..:-)
I understand, but having been to America, and got to know many there and here, they have a more outward openness, whilst we turn away and cry quietly, they do so more openly. I think this outrage shocked America to its core, and they are not a people to forgive or forget easily, nor have that stiff upper lip which we used to have. I am not sure that we do much now after seeing the out pouring of grief at Diana's funeral. Todays service at Grosvenor Square was more subdued, and solemn.
Whilst I am sometimes embarrassed -and impatient- with how my countrymen 'gush',I also know it is part of what we are. An amalgamation of so many diverse nations,cultures and ethnicities,who all have varying ways of expression in times of stress or emotion. Think of all the emotional Italians or moody Eastern Europeans who have made an imprint on the culture-so that their ways have become part of the national 'soul' over so many generations. The English have their 'stiff upper lip' because that is what has evolved as acceptable-----we Yanks are different-but for the same reason.
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Hya Yankee, same lingo but a different way of showing emotion, nothing wrong at all in that imo
Interesting that Prince Charles, in his speech in Grosvenor Square today, said he also lost a loved one, his uncle Dickie Mountbatten, to terrorism. This of course was the IRA, supported by many Americans.
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very good point LB, the Kennedy s for instance?
I dislike all this religious emotion . It always strikes me so false and even more so after ten years . I know that personal grief lasts for two or three years but even that then starts to fade.
I know several people in my road who have been placing flowers on graves for distant relatives and even neighbours for years . I can not believe it's genuine grief , maybe it's a sense of duty. Who knows .!

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