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Wokeism Again - Part 2

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andy-hughes | 09:59 Wed 01st Dec 2021 | Media & TV
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Last night I got around tyo watching the second half of Dirty Harry.

As I predicted, the piece of dialogue where the psycho referred to the man he paid to beat him somewhat unkindly, referring to his ethnicity and parentage, was cut, but the graphic beating scene was left intact.

It's odd that the history re-writers appear to find a serious extremely violent beating on film as acceptable, but racial epithets are deemed inappropriate and censored out.

I expected as much, and was not surprised.

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I recently watched live and let die for the Nth time and could not help noticing that the word "Honky" was left in but "spade" was cut. The problem is, it ruins the flow of the dialogue and therefore the artistic output the film makers intended. Surely we can invent a warning that says a film is of its time and may not be woke by modern standards. TBH though The Wire uses the N word hundreds of times and that is left in. Dunno what's going on Andy.
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I'd be interested to see how the censors would deal with an 'acceptable' broadcast of Tarentino's Django Unchained. No doubt they would give the constant graphic violence a swerve, but how they would get rid of the 'n' word which is used in excess of three hundred times in the film, is another matter.

If they cut the use each time, the film would become incomrehensible!

But then, since they are determined that simple natural usage of a term now deemed offensive cannot be allowed in the context of a film set in those times, they would probably see that as a result for their agenda.

Never mind historical context, let's all jerk our knees and faint from the vapours together!
some films are shown with advice about the content being of a racist nature, or old fashioned ideals. not sure if i care for it to be honest.
I cringe at some of the language used in old films.
I am glad that the world (on a whole) has moved on.
A warning at the start should be suffice though
i cringe at the language used in many new films, like Django unchained, how can they say it's a bad word, yet use it all the time.
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Emmie - my point is that art is about context.

If you set a film in the deep South just before the Civil War, and your dialogue is accurate, then you include the 'n' word because it was a natural and accepted part of everyday speech.

To do otherwise is to be inaccurate, and loose any sense of authenticity, which makes no sense.

Modern society does not accept the common use of the term now, but that does not mean that pretending it never existed is the way to deal with our history.
I wonder how the TV show 'Love thy Neighbour' would last today?
The sad thing is danny, that LYN was actually very anti racist and the "racist" white guy was always the one with egg on his face at the end but the wokists would be too hysterical to even watch an episode.
Love thy neighbour would still be unfunny now.
same with the Alf Garnett sitcoms.
They under value film and television, so they feel free to alter, change and bastardise it for their own aims.
Literature on the other hand is highbrow and sacrosanct. I expect Ian Flemings novels have not had the censor’s pen go through them.
Gromit //Love thy neighbour would still be unfunny now.//
So that is why it ran for eight seasons over four years.
This is a classic scene:
It wasn't all about race:-
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danny - // Gromit //Love thy neighbour would still be unfunny now.//
So that is why it ran for eight seasons over four years. //

As we have all discussed many times over many years, general acceptance is not always a measure of worth - if it was the Grease soundtrack would be a 'better' record than Graceland.

I agree with Gromit - LTY was terminally unfunny becuase it was a one-shot joke, and that does not remain funny simply because you repeat it hundreds of times.

People used to watch a man sing Mule Train and bash his head with a tin tray - but after the first, or maybe second 'bash', the novelty wore off never to return, but he kept cropping up on television for years.



Tastes change - but what is unfunny now was actually unfunny then as well.
^^^ just watched that with the sound off - it made me laugh anyway!
Fairytale of New York is due its annual dusting down and headed for the top 10.
If they try to proffer the revised version on us, I will sing ‘You cheap lousy faggot’ even louder.
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Gromit - // Fairytale of New York is due its annual dusting down and headed for the top 10.
If they try to proffer the revised version on us, I will sing ‘You cheap lousy faggot’ even louder. //

Indeed!

I think it's a lousy song from a deeply overrated writer and performer, but that does not mean it should be airbrushed to meet some ludicrous woke template of acceptability.
I remember when I was at primary school in the 60s, we used to have singing lessons.

One day we were told to turn our songbooks to 'Campdown Races'. We were told to cross out the n word, and replace it with ***.

If I Google the song lyrics now, that verse is missing. I'm not surprised.
Oh, even the Latin word for black is censored now.

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