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I Like Dawn French , I Like The Vicar Of Dibley

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Bobbisox1 | 16:38 Mon 07th Dec 2020 | Media & TV
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I liked the Vicar of Dibley but if I watch comedy I don’t want to be reminded of Covid, BLM, the ridiculous 'woke' ritual of 'Taking the Knee', or any of the other rubbish we’ve had to endure throughout this awful year. I want to be entertained - so I won’t be watching.
23:35 Mon 07th Dec 2020
Exactly naomi ..
yep, with you on this one naomi.
I thought taking the knee or kneeling was a gesture of supplication or subservience?
Isn't it ironic that it is used as a gesture of support?
i daren't take the knee, i'd never get back up
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Me either Emmie, haha
I know what you mean.
If I have to kneel it needs to be near a sturdy piece of furniture which I use to climb back up!
Fings ain' wot they used to be!
bad knees, back, can't even reach down to tie shoelaces properly...
VoD has been plenty political before. It had a special about Make Poverty History, it's touched on LGBT rights, etc.. In that narrow sense I don't see what makes this episode any more or less political than previous editions. And, besides, comedy has almost always been used to make a political point, and the UK has a fine tradition of this.
have been political comedians before like Rory Bremner but you havre to admit its getting a tad wearing, time to put it aside. I think Naomi had some good points.
The tradition of political comedians goes back further than Rory Bremner, though. There's plenty of political commentary in such giants of the British tradition as Beyond the Fringe, Frost Report, Monty Python, etc etc.

very true. Some may not know of them but i do.
but what was supposed to be a light entertainment programme?
one can watch or not of course, there is an off switch
This is a quote from the article:

"We need to focus on justice for a huge chunk of our countrymen and women who seem to have a very bad, weird deal from the day they're born."

I can't seem to reconcile that with the large number of succesful black people in this country. It seems almost hypocritical to me that professional footballers "take the knee", when that is one of the most successful areas for black people. And not badly paid either. Other areas have their fair share; the professions, legal and accountancy, education, the civil service, broadcasting etc. The present government has black people in the cabinet. How successful do they want black people to be? What special cases are we talking about? What injustices are there?

If people want to boo someone elses views, that has always been a feature of politics and campaigning in this country. It's not wrong to disagree, and it's not a crime. And various organisations shouldn't patronise and lecture the population just because they have an alternative point of view.
As I said earlier, it isn't a programme I watch anyway, but the thing is, a lot of people do and a lot won't be expecting to see this , just like Britains Got Talent, (another programme I don't watch) when they threw in that dance routine with Diversity and look at the complaints about that! I just don't agree with what you would class as light entertainment programmes throwing in this sort of thing. You shouldn't have to change channels or switch off.

The Vicar of Dibley taking the knee for BLM makes one thing clear – the BBC has lost the plot
Dawn French is back as Geraldine but her aggressively sanctimonious sermonising on Black Lives Matters strikes a discordant note
ALLISON PEARSON in this morning's Telegraph - an extract:

...... Is nowhere safe from this aggressively sanctimonious new religion? Clearly not. Dibley’s vicar, Geraldine Kennedy (Dawn French), takes the knee on the village green while the church organ plays in the background – if you can imagine such a thing. I prefer not to. Getting down on one knee is something Britons used to only do to propose marriage or tie a shoelace. What on earth will the Dibley Parish Council make of this incongruous juxtaposition of gentle English comedy and furious US identity politics?....
Allison finishes her excellent article with:

All this protest and rancour is a very long way from The Vicar of Dibley. And a good thing too. The sitcom’s healing mirth is exactly what we need at the end of this miserable year, not a self-righteous sermon on the BLM organisation that will alienate half our fellow man. If Geraldine the vicar wants a good cause to kneel for, there’s always that immortal fellow she signed up to serve. Birthday around Christmas, I believe.

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