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Do The The Bbc Think Breakfast Tv Watchers Are Morons?

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grumpy01 | 11:35 Mon 18th Mar 2019 | Media & TV
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This morning I watched and listened,as many others must have done, to a press conference given by the Assistant Chief Constable of the Police in Northern ireland.He explained very carefully that three teenagers had lost their lives at this event in Cookstown County Tyrone and that the Police were hoping that many of the young people who were there would come forward to tell Police what they saw happening.He then took some questions from journalists who were there.When the link went back to the studio Louise Minchin then went over almost word for word what we had just witnessed,how ridiculous.

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Yes, it's annoying and patronising. I hate it when the newsreaders tell you something, then they go to a reporter 'on scene' who tells you exactly the same thing!
In that respect the BBC thinks all their viewers are morons.

Watch the national or local news and you will see the same clip player three, four or five times within the space of a few minutes. As the opening credits roll you are given the headlines, and usually a snippet of a conversation with somebody. A few seconds later when the headlines are broken down into detail you seem the same clip. Halfway through the news they will repeat the headlines (for those with an attention span smaller than that of a goldfish) and you'll see the clip again. At the end of the news you'll hear "the headlines tonight..." and the same clip repeated. And if that headline happens to have a local interest for your area (such as one of the people mentioned knowing somebody who has a second cousin twice removed who buys his dog food in the area) you'll hear it all again.
Take into consideration though that many people are busy in the mornings getting ready for work. It only takes a trip to the kitchen to miss a news story so I understand why the repeat themselves.
If they are that busy then they should make other arrangements to get their news. There is no reason why people sitting down to watch it in a civilised manner should have the same thing repeated to them every few minutes.
I agree it's annoying but I don't think we're being treated like morons.
They do it because people may just have switched on.
Also, on occasions it is not always possible to hear what had been asked.
It can be irritating but there you go.
I must admit, I was a bit surprised to see that they felt the need to explain the concept of stockpiling on this morning's programme.

Not the need for it - the actual meaning of the word.
There’s really only one thing that annoys me and that’s the shouting of questions at a politician or whoever as they go past. As much use as arguing with the referee.
// There’s really only one thing that annoys me and that’s the shouting of questions at a politician or whoever as they go past //

Me too. It reached new levels of pointlessness a few days ago when some reporter shouted something inane at the PM on her way out of Downing street. This was at the time when she'd lost her voice, so couldn't have replied even if she'd wanted to.
If someone screamed at me like an insane fishwife I would ignore them too!
Another really annoying thing - which is increasing - is: 'coming up'. I can just about understand it on commercial channels, who use it just before an ad break (and then show you what you've just watched when the programme resumes), but now the BBC has started doing it. For example, in the past few weeks I've noticed at the beginning of Antiques Roadshow they show a few of the items that are 'coming up' later. I don't want to know! I want to watch the programme and be surprised and intrigued by the objects, not to have already heard about them.
New Judge - // There is no reason why people sitting down to watch it in a civilised manner should have the same thing repeated to them every few minutes. //

I think there is a reason, and the reason is that the people siting down to watch the news at that time of the day are in a small minority.

The majority of the audience, as ummm has pointed out, are busy multi-tasking, with half an ear on what's going on, and people are tuning in and out constantly.

Since you appear to have the luxury of time to sit and watch the news, maybe it is you who should alter your viewing to later in the day, when more in-depth coverage is offered - ?

//Since you appear to have the luxury of time to sit and watch the news, //
That would apparently apply to most ABers. Even those who are not of an age to retire.
I 100% agree with goodgoalie's comment at 13.21.
I also think the BBC think all their viewers are morons. I hardly ever watch ( Antiques Roadshow excepted), because the way presenters etc speak these days reminds me of when I used to watch Play School with my son.
This is true of most TV programmes, whether it be ITV or BBC ones. Programmes such as those where they do up houses will inclde the same clips several times- sometimes at the start of the programme, then againjust before the ad break and then again immediately afterwards, and then they show it properly later in the programme. I find it really frustrating and patronising at the time but I assume it's done because so many viewers are popping in and out and some are probably eating, on their laptops or phones and only half watching , or talking, or some combination.
I also get annoyed by the silly unfunny sketches they do on things like Watchdog/Rogue Traders and even Martin Lewis now does it
Choose radio, you know it makes sense.
"Since you appear to have the luxury of time to sit and watch the news,"

I don't watch the news in the mornings, Andy. I was simply relating Grumpy's description to my own experiences watching the news (which are few and far between because of the reasons I described). I can see some case for providing a "rolling" news programme in the mornings. I cannot see the point, however, for adopting the "tell 'em what you're going to tell 'em, then tell 'em, then tell 'em what you've just told 'em" approach all within the space of two minutes. People with little time might prefer two or three items in between doing their ablutions rather than one repeated three or four times.
The B.B.C. have just announced an overspend of £28 million pounds on the Eastenders set, I expect they will be asking pensioners for the money.

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