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driving after illness

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sylvania | 08:57 Mon 28th Mar 2011 | Law
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I know a lady of 81 who has not driven for 2 years due to a hip opperation and double vision. Her walking and balance is not perfect although she "says" the bouble vision has improved. Can she legally get behind the wheel again or does she need refresher lessons or another test?

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Would you feel safe getting in the car with her?
http://www.theanswerb.../Question1002763.html

umm that's not relevant to whether or not its legal.
Yes it is. If I was worried enough about someones ability to drive I would inform the DVLA.
still doesn't mean that it would be illegal for her to drive.
Question Author
In answer to ummmm. last time I went in the car with her - I felt **** scared!!!!! this was last year. She only drove about half a mile before we insisted on her handing over controls. She says the double vision has improved since then.
I would inform the DVLA then. They should have their own procedures in place to deal with this sort of thing.
"AGE (Older Drivers)
Age is no bar to the holding of a licence. DVLA requires confirmation at age of 70 that no medical disability is present, thereafter a 3-year licence is issued subject to satisfactory completion of medical questions on the application form. However, as ageing progresses, a driver or his/her relative(s) may be aware that the combination of progressive loss of memory, impairment in concentration and reaction time with possible loss of confidence, suggest consideration be given to cease driving. Physical frailty is not per se a bar to the holding of a licence."

So far as I am aware the only people who the DVLA will listen to are the person her or himself and their GP. Poor mobility or balance are not reasons to stop driving unless the balance affects sitting. Double vision may be but as i have said, its between the DVLA, the person and the GP.
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if you drove with her last year, when was the 2 year break?
If someone has a cognitive problem then there can be justification for interfering (meant in the polite, not accusatory sense). Take the car keys off someone with no cognitive impairment and you could be accused of theft or abuse so be very careful, especially if you are not related. Has he vision been medically reassessed?
<<I would have a word with her doctor and get him/ her to gently explain why she can not drive.>>

No doctor with any inklings to patient confidentiality will even give you the time of day. Even with a relative it's iffy.
I have heard of an elderly man who believed he COULD drive and was safe to... the family told him to take a driving test.. again.. and he failed... at this point they then took the keys off him and had his car sold.. to prevent him trying to drive it.

Its the safest thing really in the ling run.. for her and for others!
And I knew a bloke who went to the police and said his son had stolen his keys and the police MADE the son give them back.....be really careful here. While you may have concerns, may be right, its not as black and white as just taking the car away, especially if you aren't even a relative.
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Some unsubstantiated assumptions here. 3 years ago the double vision may not have been a problem...and it may now have improved...the fact is that we don't know, not even the OP so what would the police do?
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bednobs - when she drove it was only for 5 mins down the road when we insisted that she hands over controls. This was within the 2 years.
EDDIE51 - she has not driven since the 5 mins mentioned above, we just want to make sure she is legal when she does start driving again.
And to those who have said about renewing licences after 70 - over here in jersey channel islands our licences last for 10 years at a time. As far as i know over 70's don't need to renew earlier here.
Did you not think it might help to mention that this question is being asked about Jersey law and not UK law at the beginning.
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Just to clear things up a bit -
This lady hasn't driven for 2 years other than 5 minutes last year (as in a number of months ago over lapping into last year).This was a trial with a member of her family to see how she did.
The double vision only started mid 2010 - She stopped driving in April 2009.
She has had 2 cataracts done but double vision didn't improve. But has since then been given glasses to reduce double vision.
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Sorry ChuckFickens - didn't realise it was diferent in uk. As we are classed as british - thought driving licences were control the same way.

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