SIGN UP

further to last question

Avatar Image
jakey01 | 14:11 Sun 07th Dec 2008 | Criminal
4 Answers
Further to the above. On my first apperance in court 2 wk ago I was given leave by the court to approach 2 key witnesses who had not given statements to the police, I had spoke to them both and they were considering giving me a statement, I left it for a week, went back to them yesterday and they both refused to speak to me further as they had been told by the police not to! What on earth is going on in this country, are the police acting legally in that ? I assume that even in these days most people would consider, as did I before all this,that the police always act in a lawful manner and have the best interest of the public in mind, I am rapidly finding this is far from the truth!
Can anyone give me any advice as to what my next step should be, I am due to go back to court in the next 2 weeks
prior to the hearing in the next 3 months.
In case you have not seen my previous questions the alledged offence is a s5 public order,I am approaching 60 have no record whatsoever and this all came about simply because I hand delivered a letter to my daughter's ex employer requesting monies & wage slips owed to her. There followed a very brief exchange in which I made no threats at all but the employer who is a person of very dubious character, a fact which the police have chosen to ignore, said I did.Hence I was arrested,which led me to take out a complaint against the police.

Answers

1 to 4 of 4rss feed

Best Answer

No best answer has yet been selected by jakey01. Once a best answer has been selected, it will be shown here.

For more on marking an answer as the "Best Answer", please visit our FAQ.
your next step should be to get legal representation i would think
-- answer removed --
-- answer removed --
Particularly persons trying to put forward other people's wrongdoings, in attempt to defend themselves. What you feel you may know about a person doing wrong, and having concrete written proof of it, are two very different things. It even would be likely to land you in more trouble than you are already in, and the magistrate or judge would be likely to rule such 'evidence' as impermissible. You really do need to speak to a solicitor, and obtain someone to conduct your defence.

1 to 4 of 4rss feed

Do you know the answer?

further to last question

Answer Question >>