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Enduring power of attorney

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Sheenamf | 06:18 Sat 18th Aug 2012 | Civil
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My mother is of sound mind and in good health. She has made a will with my sister, brother and me as joint executors. She has also made the provision for my brother to have enduring power of attorney should the need arise. How would this be implemented, and who would make the decision to do so? Also does it stop my mother making me or my sister a joint signatory on her bank account whilst she is still of sound mind?

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Enduring Power of Attorney has now been replaced by something else. It is only legal if signed for before October 2007.

More here

http://www.direct.gov...anningahead/DG_186369
A search on "Endurng power of attorney" finds loads of "advice" sites.

Like this one

http://alzheimers.org...fo.php?documentID=154
any POE..would supersede any bank signatory arrangements..but only if and when it is implemented..your mum can have you and sis as joint sigs up until then..but thereafter your bro will call the shots...could mum not have you all jointly with POE..save any disputes and/or arguments/resentment if the need arises..
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Thank you for your answers. I need to tread carefully on this, but my sister is also concerned about the current arrangements. I will pursue the links - thanks again
<<save any disputes and/or arguments/resentment if the need arises.>>.

Unfortunately it doesn't - they will still take place but within the context of the power of attorney where they have the potential to cause complete stalemate wth nothing getting done because they can't agree. At least with one he can go ahead and do what is needed (paying that bill etc) and have the dispute separately

The Power of Attorney is implemented by registering it with the Office of the Public Guardian. The holder of it decides when to go ahead - but has to give notice to family members, etc, who have the right to object

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Enduring power of attorney

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