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Which Drill Bit To Use?

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tenrec | 21:03 Wed 11th Dec 2019 | How it Works
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Hi all, I've got a new kitchen wall unit carcass to replace an old one. I need to add the old doors to it. Unfortunately, these holes are not pre-drilled. What size drill bit would be the standard one to use on the carcass to drill the holes for the hinges? I have all the fittings, but don't want to cock it up! Failing this I will try a few drill bits on some waste wood until I get the right size. Thanks in advance.

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I dont know if they come in different sizes but measuring the diameter of the hinge will rule out guess work.
The drill bit should be a bit thinner than the screws you are going to use. If the hole is too big, the screws will go in too easily and won't be secure. If the hole is too small, it probably doesn't matter as the screws will cut into the chipboard of the cupboard anyway - might be harder to screw them in but they will be very solidly attached.
I think your trial and error approach (on waste wood) is the best option. Good luck.
Question Author
Thank you all for your comments. I think I will have to "trial & error" on a piece of waste wood, but do appreciate your advice. x
Are you drilling into wood or MDF?
MDF is chipboard
Question Author
Hi John, it's that cheap chipboard stuff. I'm going to get all my drill bits out of the shed and experiment on a small scrap to see how it goes, thanks.
Bit of a strange one this. You will find that the screws required will probably be different for the hinge that will be fitted to the cabinet door and the mounting plate which will be fitted to the cabinet. The reason is due to the different materials likely to be used in the door and cabinet. The doors are usually made of mdf or solid timber or even veneered or laquered mdf. These substances will allow a conventional pointed and tapered screw to be used to fix the hinge. The mounting plate which will be fixed to the cabinet does not use this type of screw to secure the plate. The cabinets are mainly made of particle (sometimes called chipboard) board which breaks up if you try to tighten a screw into it. The screws are a type of grub screw which is meant to grip a pre drilled hole at the correct depth to allow the full length of the screw but without breaking through the other side of the cabinet. These holes are 15mm deep and 5mm diameter. I would use a 4mm router type drill if you are having to drill the holes.
This is the type of screw to take a hinge plate mounted on particle board.
They are available at other suppliers. I think that B&Q do them.

https://www.screwfix.com/p/hinge-screws-m6-x-16mm-100-pack/89259
Just to add to the confusion .. dont use any old screws you happen to have kicking around. You need a parallel type screw with a very coarse thread. Ideally 2 or 3mm shorter than the thickness of the cabinet. Just like the ones Togo has shown in the link. When you screw them in you must do it with plenty pressure applied to the handle of the screwdriver. Dont screw it gently, otherwise you may just get a chunk of chipboard breaking away. Dont use a drill otherwise you may just wreck the side of the cabinet where the hinge needs to go.
Sorry .. meant dont use a 'power' drill to tighten the screws.
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Thank you all so much for the information. I have the hinges and screws already from the previous carcass. I have spent the day practising my drill skills and working out exactly where to drill the holes in the carcass to correspond with the already fixed hinges on the doors. Togo I will have a look at your link, thank you. I really appreciate the info as I can't afford to spend any more money on this project. I will report back (eventually) to tell you all how it went.
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Well today has been a long day! I built the new carcass. It's dimensions were not exactly the same as the old one, but managed to get it on the wall brackets. Also after two attempts have drilled the holes for the hingy bits and am happy that they are in the right place now. Burst a blood vessel in my finger, but it feels ok now. Couldn't have done all this without your shared knowledge. I was lacking a bit of confidence, but now feel great that I have got this far. I just have to screw through to the back wall to make sure the cupboard is absolutely safe. Many thanks to you all.
I would just fit the carcass to the wall (less weight to hold up) then fit the doors once carcass is fixed to wall.

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