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Very Old Apple Tree

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kuulteach | 22:31 Tue 12th Jun 2018 | Home & Garden
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My son has just bought a house in silver end near Braintree . The house is circa 1912... Art Deco, the village had the crittall window co. There. And, tha built houses and parks and stuff in the same way as bournville. When they built the houses they also planted a tree in each garden. My son has an apple tree in his garden it is 25ft high with a spread of 20ft. Is it possible that this is the original tree? I was thinking it could be a very old species of apple that may be of interest and worth preserving

Who are people to get in touch with preserving the strain.


Unfortunately been neglected much ivy up to 15ft high tree has split into three and is quite beautiful ... green lichen and gnarled branches. White mould... but apparently fruit is healthy ..... can this be saved?

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As has been said, the tree could easily be as old as the house but I can't see how the house can be 'circa 1912' and 'Art Deco'. The term 'Art Deco' didn't exist before 1925 and building didn't commence in Silver End until 1926.
04:00 Wed 13th Jun 2018
Perfectly possible that it dates from the time the house was built - after all, Newton's apple tree is still there!
It is possible it's the original tree, maybe these people can help more re the strain.

http://www.bifga.org.uk/


Tree preservation is via the Council I think.
you ask a pomologist apparently

My late father was always being invited in to taste various householders cider ( 1940s) and when the apple orchared were being massacred ( everyone had one) I wondered if rare varieties were dying a quiet death - and was told like Private Pike not to be a stupid boy
anyway like you to ask ?

Anyway about twenty years later - this happened . I was in Tomsy's son's class. Ho hum it was a good idea.

http://www.dorsetecho.co.uk/news/1155814.200-year-old_apple_may_be_a____new____find/

well not a new variety - and old lost one
it says there is a n apple fest every year in Symondsbury
// Newton's apple tree is still there!//

um no it died 1777
however there is a print of it and it can be identified

http://www.botanic.cam.ac.uk/Botanic/Plant.aspx?p=27&;ix=40&pid..

Flower of Kent

I dont doubt that there is one in the garden at WOolsthorpe it was replanted and grew quite quickly

The idea of tourism developed quite early in this country and people used to queue up and sit under the tree
and think - now I will have the same thoughts as Newton!
The original Bramley apple is on its last legs.
As has been said, the tree could easily be as old as the house but I can't see how the house can be 'circa 1912' and 'Art Deco'. The term 'Art Deco' didn't exist before 1925 and building didn't commence in Silver End until 1926.
well this is the place to find out what kind of apple you have. http://www.brogdalecollections.org/fruit-identification/
from the cited article
"according to records, it re-grew after a storm blew it down in 1820"
is the event I am thinking about
I favour the interpretation
according to other records, another grew after a storm blew it down in 1820, because they replanted it with a new one
oh as far as I can remember
Tomsy's granfer apple tree is in the garden of the old vicarage at Beaminster ( Hardy's Emminster ) and yup that was the place Tess walked to - to ask the Rev Clare what to do about his wayward son who had abandoned her.
( same place altho one of course is fictional)

The original Bramley apple is on its last legs.

I'm all for progress, but self-delivering apples is a step too far!
The "white mould" of which you say, is posibly Wooly Aphid.
I'd deal with that by blasting it away with a jet of water from a garden hose, if thats what it is.
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I love AB. Thank you all for your response

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