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Avoiding double glazing

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matchmade | 01:23 Sat 16th Jul 2005 | Home & Garden
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Is there any way of getting round these horrible new building regulations that all replacement windows have to be double-glazed? Even PVC one are really expensive and rarely last more than five years before the seal breaks. I don't know what the Government was thinking of because the heating money saved by double-glazing cannot be greater than the cost of having to keep replacing your windows. Most heat goes out through walls, doors and the roofs anyway: it's a simple question of square footage. And then once you've installed these idiotic sealed double-glazed windows, you have to install trickle vents to let cold fresh air into the house again, to reduce condensation! It's madness!

Also ,does anyone agree with me that double-glazed units, even in wood, look horrid? They are so fat and inelegant. PVC to my eyes is just disgusting, whereas a well-sealed and balanced single-glazed sash window is a beautiful thing and more cost-effective and environmentally-friendly in the long term.

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I have to say I agree with you matchmade & if you read my comments on this link, it'll save me writing them out again:

http://www.theanswerbank.co.uk/Home-and-Garden/Question93177.html

We have just had an extension built on the back of our 1920s house. We refused to choose the upvc route as they reduce the value and do not look in keeping. We had wood windows made which match the existing. They do have sealed units, but the sealed units are white inside and have a 10 year guarantee against the seals breaking. They do have the ugly vents, but as we have venetian blinds you do not see them anyway. As for the cost, it is not because of cost that they are now regulatory, it is to save energy. We all are paying more in some ways to save energy. Ironically it is always the consumer and not the corporations who bear the brunt of most energy saving schemes.

The building regs do not say you have to have double glazing.

They say that they have to meet certain insulation targets.

Certain glasses meet these without double glazing see here

http://www.double-glazing-uk.co.uk/Low_e.asp

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