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Painting The Stairs

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sahida | 13:09 Sun 17th Feb 2013 | Home & Garden
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sahida
Hi there, am hopping I can get some professional advice here, here we go
I am having the the stairs painted as well as the spindles, all the wood is new, so no stripping is needed, I was told the way to do it is to put two undercoat, which is water base an 3rd coat to be oil base undercoat before applying 2 coats of oil based satin wood, the only thing is that I have gone an got dulux diamond satin wood trade paint which is water base, as I was told that this is they way now to do it ! please can someone out there tell me that this is OK
Also am having the treads varnished in walnut do I need to treat this !
ThanX in advance
12:00 Sun 17th Feb 2013Report

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There are plenty of "right" ways of doing this, Sahida. Everyone will have their own preference. Dulux Diamond is one of the best. Water-based is often preferred by many decorators. Apply "knotting" solution to any knots first. Then one slightly thinned coat of water-based primer. Then 2 coats of Diamond. For the treads, I would use a hard-wearing floor...
14:16 Sun 17th Feb 2013
There are plenty of "right" ways of doing this, Sahida. Everyone will have their own preference.

Dulux Diamond is one of the best. Water-based is often preferred by many decorators.
Apply "knotting" solution to any knots first.
Then one slightly thinned coat of water-based primer.
Then 2 coats of Diamond.

For the treads, I would use a hard-wearing floor lacquer such as this........

http://www.decoratingdirect.co.uk/viewprod/j/JUNSTG/

There are plenty of other floor lacquers if you can't get this one locally.
I often use it for wooden kitchen worktops. It's virtually bomb-proof. Stairs take a lot of hard use.
If you want Walnut, then simply colour the treads with "Colron" wood dye first.
I use water water based 'satin wood' on all internal wood surfaces. In my opinion it presents a softer and more pleasing appearance than gloss paint. Furthermore any slight imperfections in the woodwork (minor dents etc) are not 'highlighted' as the are with gloss paint.

Take The Builders advice above and I feel sure you will be pleased with the results.

Al.
Water-based paints are great - quick-drying, re-coatable within an hour or two, spills and brushes easy to clean up, etc. But unlike an oil-based paint, they tend to raise the grain when applied to bare wood. It's a question of convenience versus finish, I guess.
heathfield...I know exactly what you are saying and agree. However, a second coat does smooth-out the initial coating and, if the surface is then not smooth enough, a very light sanding is all that is necessary before applying a final coating.

It would be interesting to have your further comments and to hear what The Builder's view is on my opinion.

Al.
I know what you're saying, Al, but if you wanted a perfect finish, it would depend on the type of wood, and the density and viscosity of the paint - you could end up applying a dozen coats of paint, sanding between each one! My preference is to try and get the best possible finish to bare wood, then go for an oil-based primer/undercoat, knowing the grain won't be affected.
Good point Heathy. I agree that water-based primer does raise a lot of grain. I do give that quite a hard rub-down I admit.
I guess it's just the convenience of water-based, that's all.

Sahida, as I said at the top, there are plenty of different ways. Pick out anything from what the others are saying, and you won't go wrong. :o)
Question Author
Builder... Have gone along your advice an it's looking Tops
So hi 5, an thanks to All who took time to put in there advice,
I live in a small town terrase house but I want it to feel like the
Man's castle !!! Xxx

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