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Ex Display Kitchens

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CptHastings | 15:11 Mon 07th Dec 2009 | Interiors
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I am moving house soon and need to replace the existing kitchen. I was considering buying an ex display kitchen from a showroom but I am unsure as to how difficult they could be to be adapted to fit and whether it would be necessary to go like for like on shape ie. The kitchen is a `U` shape - would I have to choose a `U` shape display one, or for example could a `L` shape be adapted? I would need to employ a kitchen fitter to do the job. Thanks in advance

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Ok, you have heard all of the others but i think you need some very simplistic clarification. When you are looking to replace your existing kitchen the best thing you can do is firstly measure your kitchen completely including were windows are from returning walls and the same with any doors and where the stop tap is and any gas mains, soil pipes, radiators,...
00:51 Wed 16th Dec 2009
Not sure about ex display but you could wait for B&Q sales. They are really good. So good that we bought ours months before we were going to install it. When it came to installation we realised they had sent 2 cupboards the wrong size. When we re ordered we had to pay full price...nearly 3 times as much....
You need to treat it merely as a kit of parts. And a cheap kit of parts as well if it is going to be useful to you.
Then if the sizes of the base and cupboard units happen to be a good fit to what you what and where you want, then consider it. Pieces like worktops, flying shelves, kickboards and pelmets you will need to check that there is enough material to do what you want - they can be and will need to be cut down. The whole thing will be pulled apart back into a kit, so there's no reason that you have to re-assemble in exactly the same configaration.
Yes, you are going to have to employ a kitchen fitter to do this, not least if you want chamfered joins on 90 degree corners to worktops
why dont you get an opinion from your kitchen fitter
You could well be getting a bargain. On the other hand, it might be worth checking out Ikea's prices online for their units. There's just a chance they might be even cheaper. Many prices for kitchen units start at astronomically high levels, so much so than even half-price offers are still overpriced. And many kitchen unit suppliers use 16mm chipboard as standard. Ikea uses 18mm chipboard. Worth a look?
Ok, you have heard all of the others but i think you need some very simplistic clarification. When you are looking to replace your existing kitchen the best thing you can do is firstly measure your kitchen completely including were windows are from returning walls and the same with any doors and where the stop tap is and any gas mains, soil pipes, radiators, CCU's and serving hatches.
Once you have done this you can then start to design your kitchen by the number of base units you need remembering to leave space for appliances (dishwasher, wm, fridge etc) and aligning wall units to keep symetry. I would advise you to get an independant designer or a fitter who can also design to help you go over it.
Once you have got a fully planned kitchen you can than use the design to work out the number of base units, wall units, and work tops you need, this will be helpful should you wish to buy an ex display kitchen, however ex display are not necessarily the cheaper or better option so I suggest you seek sound unbiased advice. Any other q's I will be happy to advise.
Hope all this helps

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