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How Does Big Business Work?

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barry1010 | 18:38 Thu 13th May 2021 | Business & Finance
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I am interested in one company, Wooga.
It is a mobile game development company formed in Berlin in 2009.
In December 2018 it was bought by Israeli company Playtika.

Playtika was bought by a US company Caesars Entertainment Corp in 2011 but 'Playtika remains an independent unit within Caesars'.

In 2016 Playtika was acquired by a Chinese consortium.

My question is - who owns Wooga, who gets the profits and who has a say in how Wooga is run?

It all seems very confusing to me

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christ and you are asking walk-ins on AB ?
I predict you will continue to be confused
Language Warning... This is how Global Financial Markets work. :))

Wooga's own website states:
"Since 2018, we are part of Playtika and contribute to their house of brands.

As part of such a big family, we benefit from exchanging knowledge and learning from other members while maintaining our distinct Wooga identity."
https://www.wooga.com/this-is-us

Playtika, which has its HQ in Israel, is about to 'go public', meaning that anyone can buy into it and share in its profits:
https://www.playtika.com/playtika-announces-launch-of-initial-public-offering/
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Thanks, Buenchico but how does Caesars and the Chinese consortium affect Wooga?
Caesars Entertainment Corporation sold Playtika in 2016 (and went bust just under a year ago, so CEC no longer exists):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrah%27s_Entertainment

As far as I can tell, the consortium that bought Playtika have always operated it at arm's length (in much the same way as shareholders in any company aren't directly involved in the day-to-day running of it).

So Playtika will have operated autonomously but with the consortium behind it acquiring any dividend payments from their privately-held shareholding and also benefiting from any increase in the value of the firm when it offers its shares to the public shortly. i.e. the consortium will make its money by selling shares in the company at a higher value than they paid to buy the company (or, that part of the company that's being 'floated', if they're only now offering part of it to the public).
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Thanks again
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