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Terry Griffin, Remittance Advice

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MWG14 | 07:49 Mon 07th Oct 2019 | Business & Finance
16 Answers
My wife has received an email today, apparently from a Terry Griffin. There is a document attached which she has not downloaded.

It is concerning remittance advice and it says that it has been paid today by B A C S.

What is this all about? A scam of some sort perhaps?

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I would ignore it.
Probably. I'd just delete it unopened.
Question Author
Thanks for the advice. I’ll advise her to do that.
If it's been paid then you'll find it in your account soon enough.
Has she checked her bank account?
That's the easiest route to determining whether she has received a BACS payment; then she could open the attachment to see why she has received it.
I have a similar email. File is an HTML - it is a wrong 'un. I am deleteing
I have rec'd a similar email. The attachment file I have is an html. I am deleting as I believe it to be bogus
Even if some money has been paid into the account it could be a way to trick you into opening the attachment which may infect your computer. An amount paid in could tempt you to open the attachment to find out where the money has come from.
I'm not sure fraudsters are actually in the business of giving their own cash away in order to entice random strangers into handing over control of their computers.....
The fraudster would need the bank details as well as the email address
Paying a few quid into someone's account is a cheap way of getting control of their computer. As hc points out, they need the bank details as well but that's been known. Safest to ignore it completely.
Yes. Under no circumstances open the link.
Any clue in the email address
Not that cheap when sending out thousands of attempts for the few percent who get caught. Besides as mentioned they'd need to know the victim's bank details. It's not plausible.
Question Author
Thank you for all your comments. My wife does not bank online so that's really the end of the matter.
Question Author
The first part of the email address is wbcsgriffin

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Terry Griffin, Remittance Advice

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