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Inability To Feel Temperature

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eve1974 | 08:48 Sun 02nd May 2021 | Body & Soul
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Is there any illness that causes a person not to feel extremes of temperature- ie not feel the cold like others do. Or conversely, not the heat.

Not in their appendage like hands, feet but rather their “internal thermostat”.

I am curious. No reason to ask just pondering

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What a good question, one that might be suitable for a post graduate degree .....e,g MRCP.

Too complex for a website but to simplify.:....but that isn't your question. Lol
I am not sure what you mean by "internal heat" but I guess that you mean "body heat" or perhaps intolerance to temperature either hot or cold.
One condition immediately springs to mind Hypothyroidism (an under active thyroid gland)
I am sure that there are others.
Loss of heat sensation in the hands and feet is a different ball game altogether and not the question that you are posing,
This bloke can withstand extreme cold.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wim_Hof
Some people who are on medication for schizophrenia tend to be able to ignore extreme heat or cold. Whether this is the effect of the illness, or of the medication is not clear.
Some people who are on medication for schizophrenia tend to be able to ignore extreme heat or cold. Whether this is the effect of the illness, or of the medication is not clear. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00543/full
Yes, not an illness, but my nephew and son have Sensory Processing Disorder and neither feel hot or cold (or pain).
Question Author
Pixie by that is it that if they TOUCH something hot / cold they do not feel it?

What I’m meaning is : (eg)

if a person were outdoors in 0deg in shorts n tee shirt but didn’t feel cold.

Or if they were in middle of a heatwave in a jumper but still felt totally fresh

(Know I’m not explaining it clearly )
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So a huge tolerance level for extremes of temperature
Sorry, eve, only just seen your reply. It's both. My nephew (especially). He had to stop working in a cafe, as he was picking up hot pans with bare hands and not noticing until they blistered.
Also, both could comfortably walk around in a t-shirt and shorts when it's minus five. It's related to their autism, so it was there to some degree or another from birth. I would think though, that a sudden or recent change (if you are thinking of anyone in particular ) would have a different cause.
There are circumstances that will make this happen but I think it tends to be temporary. DH and I used to come home from being in the Gulf and walk around in English winter in t shirts because it was so lovely not to be hot. I know that the engineers on the ship used to be able to tolerate much hotter ambient temperatures because of the circumstances in which they worked. Additionally I am sure that many of us females tolerate and enjoy MUCH colder temperatures during menopause. In all those circumstances, there is still an awareness of temperature but it doesn't cause discomfort in the same way that it would to other people...additionally heat tolerance is accompanied by profuse perspiration and the need for more fluids....interestingly I have seen research (can't find it now sorry) that bodies can be taught to sweat more by taking vigorous exercise in warm conditions and once it has learned to do this, it will sweat at lower temperatures and more profusely than someone whose body has not been "taught to sweat" in the same way. Of course none of these things are illness as such, more evidence of how the body can adapt....and everyone in theose circumstances an still feel if they get burned or frostbitten.

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