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After Brexit.

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Barsel | 18:07 Wed 25th Nov 2020 | Body & Soul
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Was watching a programme on the TV called Hospital. A man from Greece had come over here for a liver transplant, paid for by his country. They were saying that once we are out of the EU, this won't be able to happen and apparently it brings in a lot of money to our NHS. It also means of course that we won't be able to send someone from this country to a EU country for a much needed operation. I must admit I didn't know this did you? I think perhaps I didn't find out as much as I should have before I cast my vote and now I'm wondering what else we will miss out on.

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Probably in the wrong category, but didn't know where to post it.
" I didn't find out as much as I should have before I cast my vote"

And were always bein told that it was a v simple question 'yes' or 'no'.

There were all sorts of issues which loads of folk wudnt have understood properly partly cos of the misinformation cast out by both sides of the argument...
Afraid you are correct Barsel Most people had not got a clue what they were voting for , come next year they will realise what they ..Have.. voted for and probably regret it .
A lot of non EU countries have reciprocal arrangements with England for health care. Foreign governments will still arrange private contracts for their citizens and it may make it easier to deal with those who arrive on these shores suddenly needing treatment. It might encourage staff to do the necessary checks before anything other than emergency stabilisation takes place. I was always the villain when I checked out potential cases where we wouldn't get paid. Once I told consultants or other managers they had to take steps to arrange transfer back. The nurses accused me of not caring because in many cases the patients would not get treatment at home.
Anyone coming to my emergency desk for treatment will be asked if they have lived in the uk for the last 12 months, if the answer is no they will be asked for their passport or EHIC card which is photocopied they fill a form out which is sent to the overseas team to decide whether they need to pay, treatment is still carried out on the day and payment may come later.

Contrary to popular belief the NHS is not contribution based its residency based, so an expat who hasn't lived here for 1 year will be treated the same as anyone else.
^Contrary to popular belief the NHS is not contribution based its residency based, so an expat who hasn't lived here for 1 year will be treated the same as anyone else who hasn't been here for one year
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I don't think this guy had lived here a year ( I might be wrong) but without the operation he would soon have died, and I think he was only in his 30's. If their country are paying for the operation, I don't have a problem with that, unless of course the liver could have been used to save someone who is resident in this country.
Yes, there's a lot of traffic via what's known as the S2 route: planned treatment abroad. Many people do come here for treatment, paid for by their own healthcare service, and vice versa. You have to get agreement from your own Trust before you go.

It may be that in the future we might still participate in the reciprocal healthcare agreements as do some other nations eg Norway.

https://www.nhs.uk/using-the-nhs/healthcare-abroad/going-abroad-for-treatment/going-abroad-for-medical-treatment/
I am not sure why it won't happen after brexit? I am also not sure why the NHS operates any kind of "for profit" operation while there are still UK citizens on waiting lists?
Because it's part and parcel of EU membership woof, so if we wanted to participate in it after Brexit we'd need to make a new separate agreement with the EU; as have Norway, Iceland, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.
china does it happen on ehic then? because if it does, how does the UK make a profit?
If I had been aware of this, I would still have voted leave!
Same with EHIC - can't use after end of this year. But don't throw yours away just yet! As far as I know there's no new agreement yet but that's up to the gov.

With unforeseen treatment under EHIC we actually have waiver agreements with several countries - Denmark, Estonia, Norway, Finland, Hungary and Malta. In other countries I believe actual costs of treatment are claimed back from each to each.

As to planned, pre-agreed treatment as described in the OP, perhaps Rowan or someone working in that sort of area can explain more. I believe it's down to individual Trusts how much they charge and how many beds they allocate for such treatment.
It has not been widely known in the UK that within the EU it is a matter of entitlement that anyone can seek medical treatment abroad if locally the treatment is unavailable, of lower standard and/or the wait for local treatment is excessive. The Greek example in the OP may have been such a case. Somewhere there is a list of the take-up of this option country by country and it makes interesting reading. UK take-up has been noticeably low as (if I remember correctly) has been the demand for treatment in the UK. The low UK take-up can probably best be explained by the widespread (mistaken) assumption within the UK that NHS treatment/service is the best available. Or perhaps the biggest hurdle has been the fact that the local health authorities must approve an application to go abroad for treatment (because ultimately the bill goes there).
I think most NHS hospital have always had a ward for private patients. I know when I trained at The Middlesex in the 1960 we had a whole wing of single rooms for private patients
Many EU health tourists don't pay - they skip back and we can't find them.

Midwifery is specially popular. Our standards are better and the child can get dual nationality. Aren't we lovely generous people?
I'm afraid a great many folk were focused on one thing, Barsel and didn't find out as much as they should before voting to leave.
I don't think it's going to be all sweetness and light for your country after January, sadly.
// Many EU health tourists don't pay - they skip back and we can't find them.

Midwifery is specially popular. Our standards are better and the child can get dual nationality. Aren't we lovely generous people? //

All of the above is untrue.
This farce has gone on for way too long. Back in the day when I voted to leave the EU, I foolishly thought that we would leave the EU.

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