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Re: Svt Treatment

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midagetrolop | 22:13 Fri 12th Jan 2018 | Body & Soul
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FAO - SQAD

Hi Sqad I know it's some months since I asked you about the above, and you asked me to tell you how I got on. Well , still suffering , been to A & E about 20 times since last May. Went to see a specialist in June - he then handed me over to an Electrophysicist. I had an unsuccessful ablation on the 9th October last year. Different drugs beta-blockers have been tried but still having episodes - three this week. Went to see Electrophysicist Doctor on Tuesday evening and he has suggested a pacemaker and following that 6-8weeks later zapping the AV node. Will this do the trick - I hope? Have had no quality of life for some months can't go on holiday cos don't know when it will happen, usually in the middle of the night! What happens though if pacemaker fails?

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Hi!. Yes I remember your problem well. SVT that is not responding to conventional treatment and to cut a long story short, you have had an ablation which has not been successful which is unusual but it happens. It is not my area of expertise, but I thought that an ablation and "zapping "of the A-V node was the same thing. Whichever.....you seem to have come to the...
03:48 Sat 13th Jan 2018
Hi!.
Yes I remember your problem well.
SVT that is not responding to conventional treatment and to cut a long story short, you have had an ablation which has not been successful which is unusual but it happens.
It is not my area of expertise, but I thought that an ablation and "zapping "of the A-V node was the same thing.
Whichever.....you seem to have come to the end of the road and a pacemaker is the likely answer and are easy to insert, last around 5 years in duration and are "life saving" in many occasions and in you condition would not hesitate to have one inserted.

" What happens though if pacemaker fails?"
See the glass as half full and not half empty......pacemakers have come a long way and the outlook is excellent.

http://www.heartrhythmalliance.org/files/files/aa/for-patients/Nicky's%20story.pdf

I am not one for multiple links , but I thought that this may be of help as it mirrors your case perfectly.
>>> What happens though if pacemaker fails?

A friend of mine ended up face down in his food (in a pub restaurant) when his heart temporarily stopped beating when he was in his early fifties. (He was far from unfit; he was Head of PE at the school I taught at). He had a pacemaker fitted and was fine thereafter. He's approaching 90 now and still going strong. So his pacemakers seem to have been doing their job!
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Thanks Sqad, this problem is nothing new I have had it for 20 years but beta blockers have worked and my cardiologist at the time said there was no point fitting a pacemaker if the drugs were working. They have for many years but all of a sudden last April my heart went out of control and I could not stop it. On first name terms with my A & E at Barnsley, they have been wonderful. I have downloaded the link you sent and will give it my undivided attention. Many thank again and to other who replied. Will keep you in touch. June X
I love these: 'yeah sqad I have had this for 20 y but never asked anyone about it like the steady stream of professors of cardiology who sued to come in and cluck at my many ECGs - whaddya think - wos it all abart ven ?'

If you have had ECGs for 20 y - you will have a label stuck on you. "Intermittent SVT without evidence of accelerated conduction" springs to mind but I am not a mind reader nor a doctor. Times change and so do drugs. They have tried b-blockers and there is 'breakthrough' or whatever. They work for me.
You have had ECG mapping and this will have been discussed by your doctors at hospital - more than once. Every procedure has a failure rate. You will have been told that.

Pacemakers dont just now go - bonk-bonk when you miss a beat. Pacemaker technology has advanced lots since Hudson put the first one in Wolverhampton in 1962. (in England) - or even the Devon Bradycardia project in 1980. They ( pacemakers - and doctors! - ) do all sorts of other things such as shock you out of the tachy when it senses one - they really are that good. er the pacemakers

Pacemakers are designed to be fail-safe. So that if they fail - they dont fail in such a way to kill you. Think West World. Here failure means that it doesnt shock you when it senses you need one.
So nada happens when it fails. Nichty nochty. Rien. zoop. diddly squat. Silence ....... but not deadly silence.

Honestly these are things you should be discussing with your specialist doctors in the Hospital and not someone sipping Gin in Ibiza ( Hi Sqad! ) or me - a devoted Daily Mail reader. If they decide to pau in a pacemaker which they have not - then they have to tell you which one
PP.......
" So that if they fail - they dont fail in such a way to kill you. Think West World."

Steady on, the OP didn't mean if they suddenly stopped, she meant that if they failed to control her SVT,s
P.S I don't drink Gin and you have got the wrong Balearic Island.
Sqad drinks Protos Ribera Del Duero...
LOL^^^^ he does....;-)
We'll share a bottle at Sunset one day, Sqad!

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