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I think you'll find they're two different words.
In legalese quashed would normally be correct.
In Law I'd say quashed, if you are talking oranges then squash!
Question Author
They're pretty much the same, are they not?
No, not the same!
Not really, quash means put an end to whereas squash means squueze or put pressure on
Question Author
I always find it funny when I hear that word in a court of law.
Why should you, gran.

There are two commonly used definitions of the verb "to quash":

1. ...to annul or make void (a law, decision, etc.)

This is where it would be used in a court of law.

2. ...to subdue forcefully and completely; put down; suppress

As in to quash a revolt or rebellion.

In neither case is anything physically squeezed out of shape (e.g to squash a grape) and the two words have completely different meanings.
The two words do have completely different meanings to quash is to invalidate or set aside a decision subject to judicial review .A Quashing order is obtained by application to the high court and quashes them if they are ultra vires (beyond the powers).
What other words do you find funny Gran?
squashed =squeeze
quashed = annul ,nullify,recant etc
Depends on whether you are squeezing something or finishing it off.

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