What would happen if while driving your vehicle

was hit by another driver being pursued by the police ?
18:45 Mon 02nd Jan 2012
 
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I suppose it would depend how fast all three cars were going...
you'd be hoping they were insured!
-- answer removed --
Well you shouldn't have been driving on the other side of the road, four times over the limit!
Question Author
I am watching 'Road Wars' on Pick TV and the police were in hot pursuit (Smokey & the Bandit stylee) of a suspected drunk driver who was all over the place - as he sped up to try and shake off the police they hit another driver who had already pulled over to let them and the police by, but I heard the police utter a car registration, but unsure if it was the innocent driver's registration or not in case they needed assistance...just wondered.....
Question Author
LOL @ DT :)
You would have to go through your insurance in the normal manor and if it is a stolen vehicle it would not be insured so the only option would be for your insurance company to pursue the claim agaist the thief.
My car was stolen about 30 years ago and the thief drove into a car which was only insured third party.
The owner thought my insurance would pay. The insurance company paid for my car but not for the the other car as there was no negligence on my part.
Another incident happened to me about 6 years ago. The police threw a stinger which deflated my tyres a few years ago. Unfortunately my car was the same colour and type as the one they were trying to stop.
My tyres only had about a quarter of the tread left and I only got compensation of a quarter of the replacement value.
This would have been fair enough under normal circumstances.
I had a new car on order at the time and my old car was being taken in part exchange. I had to buy new tyres and it made no difference to the trade in value so I in effect lost nearly £200.

Martin
MartinBev is wrong. If a car is stolen and the thief crashes into another car, the insurer of the stolen car will pay for the damage to the other car.
Hi Flip Flop

What happened in my case the third party kept coming around to my house demanding I pay for the damage to his car as my insurance would not pay him and I had to get a court order to ban him from from the road I lived in.
I understand if the accident had happened now there may be some recourse to the Motor Insurance Bureau which pays out on behalf of uninsured drivers and then they try to recover the money from the uninsured driver but I do not think there can be any claim against the owner of the stolen cars insurance.
My insurance company replaced my car very quickly as it was under 12 months old.

Martin
Sorry Martin / Flip Flop I just messed up my answer.
Hi Flip Flop

What happened in my case the third party kept coming around to my house demanding I pay for the damage to his car as my insurance would not pay him and I had to get a court order to ban him from from the road I lived in.
I understand if the accident had happened now there may be some recourse to the Motor Insurance Bureau which pays out on behalf of uninsured drivers and then they try to recover the money from the uninsured driver but I do not think there can be any claim against the owner of the stolen cars insurance.
My insurance company replaced my car very quickly as it was under 12 months old.

Martin

I think your answer is correct for the time it happened to you.

Amy
ooops, sorry, didn't see that what happened to MartinBev was 30 years ago.

The current situation is as follows;

If the car is stolen, hits another car, and the thief is identified, the insurer of the car deals with the third party loss as part of its obligations under the Road Traffic Act.

If the car is stolen, hits another car, and the thief is unidentified, the insurer of the car is not the RTA Insurer, but under an agreement with the MIB called the Untraced Drivers Agreement, the insurer of the car will deal with the third party loss.

The result, in either scenario, is that the third party will not go uncompensated.

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