When you keep something in mind do you 'bare' or 'bear' it?

I'm thinking that it has to be the former as the latter is a noun but I'm really unsure after a sentence I've just written.
02:37 Sat 07th Jul 2007
 
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To 'bare' something means to undress or uncover, whereas 'bear' can mean (in context) to carry a load so the proper useage here would be to bear the thought... (past participle; borne or born, past tense is bore)
I use bear
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Thanks guys
Question Author
'I can't 'bare' the thought of it'

that seems to be the usual spelling though?
people often seem to get this one mixed up - a company email went round reminding us that someone was allergic to nuts or something and that we had to "bare" him in mind when preparing food in the kitchen... well it put me right off my lunch following that particular order!
Sainsbury's are currently selling some garden lights that appear to be particularly good if you have lodgers; they're apparently good for boarders.
Oh no! A tv prog recently used "it's" rather than "its"-I know it sounds a bit sad, but I just can't stand that!
x
the function room at my local working mens club is available for higher. just thought i'd let you all know. they also provide buffet's.
During one of the tennis documentaries they showed on BBC when it rained at Wimbledon, the captions kept referring to MENS' FINAL and MENS' SEMI-FINAL .
Immi - hoist on your own petard? I think you meant working men's club...
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Everyone from LeMarchand onwards � oh, how, much, I,feel you're, payne. Eats, Shoots & Leaves.....
Drove past a house with a sign saying "no access, privet drive"
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Maybe they were being literal. Did you check if they had the very British equivalent of an inaccessible rainforest in their driveway?
re: During one of the tennis documentaries they showed on BBC when it rained at Wimbledon, the captions kept referring to MENS' FINAL and MENS' SEMI-FINAL .

This is correct. As for 'bear vs. bare', it's 'bear in mind', as the word 'bare' refers to naked.

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